Astronomers probe origin of Planet 9

September 14, 2017
How do we know there’s a Planet 9?
Artist’s impression of Planet Nine, blocking out the Milky Way. The Sun is in the distance, with the orbit of Neptune shown as a ring. Credit: ESO/Tomruen/nagualdesign

Astronomers at the University of Sheffield have shown that 'Planet 9' – an unseen planet on the edge of our solar system – probably formed closer to home than previously thought.

A team led by Dr Richard Parker from the University of Sheffield's Department of Physics and Astronomy has found that Planet 9 is 'unlikely' to have been captured from another planetary system, as has previously been suggested, and must have formed around the sun.

The outskirts of the solar system have always been something of an enigma, with astronomers in the late 19th and early 20th centuries searching for a giant planet that wasn't there, and the subsequent discovery of Pluto in 1930.

Pluto was downgraded in status to a 'dwarf planet' because astronomers discovered many other small objects – so-called Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt objects – at similar distances from the sun.

In 2016 astronomers working in the USA postulated the presence of 'Planet 9' to explain the strange orbital properties of some Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt objects.

But while it isn't possible to directly observe Planet 9, it hasn't stopped theorists from trying to work out how it got there.

Planet 9 is at least 10 times bigger than Earth, making it unlikely that it formed at such a large distance from the sun. Instead, it has been suggested it either moved there from the inner regions of the solar system, or it could have been captured when the sun was still in its birth star cluster.

But a team, led by Dr Parker with colleagues from ETH Zurich, has shown that the capture scenario is extremely unlikely.

Researchers simulated the sun's stellar nursery where interactions are common and found that even in conditions optimised to capture free-floating planets, only five-to-10 out of 10,000 planets are captured onto an orbit like Planet 9's.

Dr Parker said: "We know that form at the same time as , and when stars are very young they are usually found in groups where interactions between stellar siblings are common. Therefore, the environment where stars form directly affects planetary systems like our own, and is usually so densely populated that stars can capture other stars or planets.

"In this work, we have shown that - although capture is common - ensnaring onto the postulated orbit of Planet 9 is very improbable. We're not ruling out the idea of Planet 9, but instead we're saying that it must have formed around the sun, rather than captured from another planetary system."

The study was published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

Explore further: Theft behind Planet 9 in our solar system

More information: Was Planet 9 captured in the Sun's natal star-forming region? arXiv:1709.00418 [astro-ph.EP] arxiv.org/abs/1709.00418

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maholmes1
3.6 / 5 (8) Sep 14, 2017
As far as I know, this "planet" is still hypothetical. It hasn't been observed. And it should be called Planet X, not Planet 9. There's already a Planet 9. Depending on whether you adhere to a simple geophysical definition of planet or add a 2000-kilometer minimum diameter to it, Planet 9 is either Neptune or Pluto.

Also, no other object as big as Pluto (1471 miles in diameter) or the very slightly smaller Eris (1445 miles in diameter) has yet been discovered in the Kuiper Belt. They're both bigger than the next largest object that is geophysically a planet, Makemake (approximately 890 miles in diameter), by far.
thomasw2
1 / 5 (6) Sep 15, 2017
so why not send a probe around the sun to the otherside and have a look
antialias_physorg
4.3 / 5 (6) Sep 15, 2017
so why not send a probe around the sun to the otherside and have a look

I don't know if you've heard this, but space is rather big.
Maggnus
5 / 5 (6) Sep 15, 2017
so why not send a probe around the sun to the otherside and have a look

I don't know if you've heard this, but space is rather big.


And, we are on the other side every 6 months.....
Captain Stumpy
5 / 5 (5) Sep 15, 2017
so why not send a probe around the sun to the otherside and have a look
erm...

or just wait till March?
laurele
1.8 / 5 (5) Sep 15, 2017
Please refer to this hypothetical world with the traditional term used for suspected but undiscovered planets, which is Planet X (with X referring to the unknown, not to the number 10). If this object exists, it is NOT the solar system's ninth planet. Pluto's downgrade remains a matter of controversy and debate and should be not be depicted as fact, as many scientists prefer a geophysical planet definition that includes all worlds large enough to be rounded by their own gravity. With this definition, the solar system already has more than nine planets, as dwarf planets are planets too. They are a subclass of planets. That means we have a minimum of 13 planets already, so this one would at minimum be Planet 14.
Maggnus
3.7 / 5 (9) Sep 15, 2017
Please refer to this hypothetical world with the traditional term used for suspected but undiscovered planets, which is Planet X (with X referring to the unknown, not to the number 10). If this object exists, it is NOT the solar system's ninth planet. Pluto's downgrade remains a matter of controversy and debate and should be not be depicted as fact, as many scientists prefer a geophysical planet definition that includes all worlds large enough to be rounded by their own gravity. With this definition, the solar system already has more than nine planets, as dwarf planets are planets too. They are a subclass of planets. That means we have a minimum of 13 planets already, so this one would at minimum be Planet 14.

Nope, The IAU has made their decision and they have indicated it will not be revisited. AS it stands, there are 8 planets with a possible 9th. Your agreement is not necessary.
maholmes1
3 / 5 (6) Sep 16, 2017
Please refer to this hypothetical world with the traditional term used for suspected but undiscovered planets, which is Planet X (with X referring to the unknown, not to the number 10). If this object exists, it is NOT the solar system's ninth planet. Pluto's downgrade remains a matter of controversy and debate and should be not be depicted as fact, as many scientists prefer a geophysical planet definition that includes all worlds large enough to be rounded by their own gravity. With this definition, the solar system already has more than nine planets, as dwarf planets are planets too. They are a subclass of planets. That means we have a minimum of 13 planets already, so this one would at minimum be Planet 14.

Nope, The IAU has made their decision and they have indicated it will not be revisited. AS it stands, there are 8 planets with a possible 9th. Your agreement is not necessary.


They'll revisit it. They're scientists, after all.
Ultron
1.8 / 5 (5) Sep 16, 2017
There is no Planet 9. Its just sign of incomplete GRT.
thomasw2
1 / 5 (7) Sep 17, 2017
We can see 13 + billion light years away but we can't see around our sun.
thomasw2
1 / 5 (7) Sep 17, 2017
There is no Planet 9. Its just sign of incomplete GRT.

have you been to the other side of the sun ?
Da Schneib
5 / 5 (6) Sep 17, 2017
There is no Planet 9. Its just sign of incomplete GRT.

have you been to the other side of the sun ?
Yes. We all have. Every year or so.
thomasw2
1 / 5 (6) Sep 18, 2017
Sure but what's going on opposite from us on the other side of the sun while we are orbiting around the sun. don't answer as i know you knew this is what i meant.
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (5) Sep 18, 2017
Sure but what's going on opposite from us on the other side of the sun while we are orbiting around the sun. don't answer as i know you knew this is what i meant.

1) Planets at different distances have different orbital periods. It is not possible for a plent to always be exactly opposite Earth (especially not Planet 9 which, by all calculations, is pretty far away from the sun - so would have an orbital period, far, far longer than that of Earth)
2) Even if a planet were to share an orbit exactly with Earth it would not stay directly 'opposite' the sun at all times, because orbital speed varies with distance (Earth is not in a circular orbit but an elliptical one - just like every other planet). Google for Kepler's laws of orbital motion.
3) Yes, we've had satellites that went far out into the solar system look back (Voyager et. al). And no, they didn't see any mirror-Earths (they were able to see Earth just fine).
plutosavior
3.3 / 5 (7) Sep 18, 2017
@Maggnus Science is not decided by decree of "authority." That is dogma. Planetary scientists do not need the permission of the IAU to define the term planet, and the IAU does not get to dictate one definition in complete disregard of the views of the world's leading planetary scientists. Deciding not to ever revisit the issue itself reflects that the IAU is practicing dogma rather than science. The 424 IAU members who created the flawed 2006 definition were mostly not planetary scientists but other types of astronomers, and their decision was and remains opposed by an equal number of professional planetary scientists. Our solar system does not have only 8 planets; it has 13 and counting. Your agreement and that of the IAU are not necessary.
Maggnus
3 / 5 (8) Sep 18, 2017
No, it is not dogma, it is the standard of the scientific community, You don't have to like it, nor does it matter what you think about it, The IAU has been charged with the task of determining the scientific basis by which the term "planet" is considered. If you were a member, you could present your case for a different definition.

The current definition of "planet" does not include the dwarf planets, including Pluto. Your agreement or lack thereof is irrelevant.

Until you graduate and obtain a degree and become a member of the IAU, you will have to accept the decision and call it what they have decided. If you're not in class or a member of the scientific community, then you're a layman, and you can call it whatever the hell you want. Scientists will call it what the IAU has decided it is - a dwarf planet.

And yes, the agreement of the IAU IS necessary. They are the governing body until they are replaced. End of story.
plutosavior
3.4 / 5 (5) Sep 19, 2017
No, the IAU definition is NOT the standard of the scientific community. It is one standard among several currently in use. The IAU is charged with naming objects, NOT determining a definition of them. Owen Gingerich, chair of the 2006 IAU committee on planet definition, has admitted as much.

You seem to view science as some sort of dictatorship, with the IAU playing a view much like that of the church in Galileo's time. Even Neil de Grasse Tyson, who does not view Pluto as a planet, acknowledges that nothing in science should ever be accepted blindly because someone or a group of someones say it is true. Today, many planetary scientists are choosing not to join the IAU and/or to ignore the IAU planet definition. Yet you would privilege a definition created by non-planetary scientists over one used by those whose field is the study of planets.
plutosavior
3.4 / 5 (5) Sep 19, 2017
No, I do not have to accept the decision of the IAU, especially when leading planetary scientists such as Alan Stern continue to reject that decision.

"So start calling Pluto a planet right now. Add to the consensus, because that's how science makes progress, by one person at a time being convinced of the truth and adopting it. Science is not decided by votes and you are not required to submit to nonsense." ~Dr. Philip Metzger, planetary scientist
antialias_physorg
4.3 / 5 (6) Sep 19, 2017
Science is not decided by decree of "authority." That is dogma. Planetary scientists do not need the permission of the IAU to define the term planet,

Erm...I'm not aware if you know this, but setting a definition is not 'science'. That's just setting a label.

What you're railing against isn't science but the setting of a name by a consensus body for convenience' sake, so that when people write papers they talk about the same thing.
You're basically getting your panties in a bunch over something on the level of:
"They shouldn't have renamed Coke to Coke Classic!"

Pluto is still there. It's still doing the same thing it was doing before. Science is still *exactly* the same as it was before. Get over it.

patrickm55
3 / 5 (6) Sep 19, 2017
"Planet 9" IS in fact, Pluto. It really comes down to common usage and many of us, regular folks, Planetary scientists and Amateur Astronomers will NOT relent! Sick and tired of those who have declared themselves "Masters of The Universe" giving them the "Right" to redefine everything!
patrickm55
3 / 5 (6) Sep 19, 2017
Maggnus, Astronomy is the oldest of the Sciences. Of course it was started by those who "Looked up" . One does not need a degree to be an Astronomer and in fact many, like myself, have actually made discoveries by "looking up" and in fact that is how the science began. Astronomy today, is taught by amateurs mostly not professionals. Go discover something then get back to me:)
patrickm55
2 / 5 (4) Sep 19, 2017
Maggnus, IF Dr Alan Stern says your attitude is arrogant then that's all that matters.
patrickm55
3 / 5 (4) Sep 19, 2017
As to the question of "Other" planets still yet undiscovered I say there is a probability that there are, however, just saying you think there are is not a "discovery"!
maholmes1
2.3 / 5 (3) Sep 19, 2017
Science is not decided by decree of "authority." That is dogma. Planetary scientists do not need the permission of the IAU to define the term planet,

Erm...I'm not aware if you know this, but setting a definition is not 'science'. That's just setting a label.

What you're railing against isn't science but the setting of a name by a consensus body for convenience' sake, so that when people write papers they talk about the same thing.
You're basically getting your panties in a bunch over something on the level of:
"They shouldn't have renamed Coke to Coke Classic!"

Pluto is still there. It's still doing the same thing it was doing before. Science is still *exactly* the same as it was before. Get over it.



Proper definitions are important to science.
antialias_physorg
4.4 / 5 (7) Sep 19, 2017
Proper definitions are important to science.

No. Only consistent definitions. 'Proper' (whatever that' s suppposed to mean) doesn't matter.
maholmes1
3 / 5 (4) Sep 19, 2017
So if I were to say that the earth is a flat object around which the sun,moon and the other planets revolve, it would be okay with you as long as it were consistent?
plutosavior
2.3 / 5 (6) Sep 19, 2017
@antialias_physorg There is no consensus among planetary scientists that the IAU has the right to set such definitions, just as there is no consensus among planetary scientists in favor of their definition. Plenty of planetary scientists refer to Pluto and other dwarf planets as planets in their scientific papers. The question is not whether Pluto is still out there but the need to recognize that more than one definition is currently in use and that the IAU definition, which has caused much public confusion, does not have to be accepted as anything more than one view in an ongoing debate. And sorry, but "getting over it" is not an option, and I refuse to do that.
DrPhiltill
2.3 / 5 (6) Sep 19, 2017
Where the IAU messed up was when they voted that a dwarf planet is not a planet but is a distinct category. That is classification, not defining terms. In zoology, for comparison, scientists define terms by naming types, but it is forbidden for the naming committee to declare which species belong to which types and whether one type is a subcategory of another type. They defiantly state that each and every working scientist has the right to argue for any classification they think is right based on the ever-evolving science. To have a body VOTE for a classification scheme would be to shut down the very heart and soul of science. The IAU did a very serious no-no when they dipped into classification by authoritarian, majority decree. That is not how science works. It is anti-science. As for me (a professional planetary scientist), dwarf planets are a subcategory of planets, just like gas giant planets are a subcategory of planet.
DrPhiltill
2.3 / 5 (6) Sep 19, 2017
Quoting from the code of the International Committee for Zoological Naming (zoology's equivalent of the IAU): "(1) The Code refrains from infringing upon taxonomic judgment, which must not be made subject to regulation or restraint. (2) Nomenclature does not determine the inclusiveness or exclusiveness of any taxon, nor the rank to be accorded to any assemblage...(3) The device of name-bearing types allows names to be applied to taxa without infringing upon taxonomic judgment....(4) Nomenclatural rules are tools that are designed to provide the maximum stability compatible with taxonomic freedom."

Taxonomic freedom. Something the IAU tried to abolish from astronomy. It is the DUTY of scientists to reject their misguided attempt to regulate and restrain our taxonomic freedom. Period.
DrPhiltill
2.3 / 5 (6) Sep 19, 2017
To take this one step further, I agree with Galileo, Huygens, and astronomers throughout history who have considered large, round moons to be a subcategory of planet. Not all moons are planets and not all planets are moons, because dynamical classification and geophysical classification are two parallel schema of taxonomy. Similarly, not all mammals are carnivores and not all carnivores are mammals, because these terms belong to two different schema for classifying animals. In my taxonomic freedom, I argue that dynamical classification should be kept distinct from geophysical classification, because the processes that change the dynamical states of a body (like being captured into or ejected from an orbit) are largely distinct from the processes that change their geophysical state (I.e., planet formation processes). Therefore, when dwarf planet Triton was captured by Neptune it changed dynamical classification and became a moon, but geophysically it remained a small planet.
DrPhiltill
2.3 / 5 (6) Sep 19, 2017
The IAU's ill-considered, off the cuff, and anti-scientific attempt at regulating taxonomy had the goal of limiting the number of planets to a very small number (hardly a scientific goal), so to accomplish that they mixed together dynamical and geophysical classification schemes. In my taxonomic freedom I consider this to be a grotesque monstrosity of no scientific value, which will soon be discarded. Indeed it is already being ignored in science publications since it provides no practical value to working scientists. On the other hand, there are scores of recent papers calling Titan, Pluto, Ceres,and Earth's Moon "planet" because that IS a useful classification. So the IAU is being ignored and taxonomic freedom will prevail.
Maggnus
3.3 / 5 (7) Sep 20, 2017
@antialias_physorg There is no consensus among planetary scientists that the IAU has the right to set such definitions, just as there is no consensus among planetary scientists in favor of their definition. Plenty of planetary scientists refer to Pluto and other dwarf planets as planets in their scientific papers. The question is not whether Pluto is still out there but the need to recognize that more than one definition is currently in use and that the IAU definition, which has caused much public confusion, does not have to be accepted as anything more than one view in an ongoing debate. And sorry, but "getting over it" is not an option, and I refuse to do that.

Ok, now you are just being obtuse, Of course the IAU has the authority, and your diatribe and confirmation you can't "get over it" is proof of your obstinance.
Maggnus
3.9 / 5 (7) Sep 20, 2017
So if I were to say that the earth is a flat object around which the sun,moon and the other planets revolve, it would be okay with you as long as it were consistent?

Saying that in the absence of support for your position would make you a quack. A consistent quack is still a quack.
Maggnus
3.3 / 5 (7) Sep 20, 2017
Where the IAU messed up was when they voted that a dwarf planet is not a planet but is a distinct category. That is classification, not defining terms. In zoology, for comparison, scientists define terms by naming types, but it is forbidden for the naming committee to declare which species belong to which types and whether one type is a subcategory of another type. They defiantly state that each and every working scientist has the right to argue for any classification they think is right based on the ever-evolving science. To have a body VOTE for a classification scheme would be to shut down the very heart and soul of science. The IAU did a very serious no-no when they dipped into classification by authoritarian, majority decree. That is not how science works. It is anti-science. As for me (a professional planetary scientist), dwarf planets are a subcategory of planets, just like gas giant planets are a subcategory of planet.

Your opinion is not relevant.
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (6) Sep 20, 2017
So if I were to say that the earth is a flat object around which the sun,moon and the other planets revolve, it would be okay with you as long as it were consistent?

If you could show that it's consistent with observation, sure. But you can't since such a definition would predict different behavior (ships not appearing over the horizon the way they do and whatnot). It's not consistent.

So you're totally missing the point here. They did not redefine any sort of behavior. They just changed a label. It's more like if someone decided that we should all call Earth now 'Glub'. Would it change anything in science? No.
Ojorf
4 / 5 (4) Sep 20, 2017
So if I were to say that the earth is a flat object around which the sun,moon and the other planets revolve, it would be okay with you as long as it were consistent?


What does that have to do with changing definitions?

If we redefine "flat" as "spherical" and "sun" as "earth"
and "earth" as "sun" your statement would be true.
No science would change, as long as we are consistent and everyone uses the new terms everything stays the same.
novaman
Sep 20, 2017
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
thomasw2
3.7 / 5 (3) Sep 20, 2017
Sure but what's going on opposite from us on the other side of the sun while we are orbiting around the sun. don't answer as i know you knew this is what i meant.

1) Planets at different distances have different orbital periods. It is not possible for a plent to always be exactly opposite Earth (especially not Planet 9 which, by all calculations, is pretty far away from the sun - so would have an orbital period, far, far longer than that of Earth)
2) Even if a planet were to share an orbit exactly with Earth it would not stay directly 'opposite' the sun at all times, because orbital speed varies with distance (Earth is not in a circular orbit but an elliptical one - **

somehow the different orbit speeds slipped my mind, off course no 2 planets orbit alike, thanks for refreshing this basic fact to me.
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (6) Sep 20, 2017
If we redefine "flat" as "spherical" and "sun" as "earth"
and "earth" as "sun" your statement would be true.

I think Richard Reynman really nailed the difference between science and label when he said:
"If you memorize all the names of all the birds in the world - you still don't know anything about birds"

(He was infamous for not remembering technical terms...only forcing himself to when he needed to write papers or communicate with fellow scientists. He was into understanding concepts)
maholmes1
3.5 / 5 (4) Sep 20, 2017
Where the IAU messed up was when they voted that a dwarf planet is not a planet but is a distinct category. That is classification, not defining terms.

Your opinion is not relevant.


That's not going to make the boogeyman under your bed go away. Pluto is still a planet to a lot of astronomers and this opinion is still quite relevant.

maholmes1
3.7 / 5 (3) Sep 20, 2017
If we redefine "flat" as "spherical" and "sun" as "earth"
and "earth" as "sun" your statement would be true.

I think Richard Reynman really nailed the difference between science and label when he said:
"If you memorize all the names of all the birds in the world - you still don't know anything about birds"



And you don't need to know all the names of every planet orbiting the Sun and every known planet orbiting other stars. You just need to know what a planet is. The planetary scientists have that covered.
Maggnus
3.3 / 5 (7) Sep 20, 2017
Where the IAU messed up was when they voted that a dwarf planet is not a planet but is a distinct category. That is classification, not defining terms.

Your opinion is not relevant.


That's not going to make the boogeyman under your bed go away. Pluto is still a planet to a lot of astronomers and this opinion is still quite relevant.



No, actually it is not. The IAU is the body charged with officially assigning designations. I don't see why some find this so hard to understand. Any person can call any object anything they want. If you are writing a scientific paper, and want to be understood, you have to use the nomenclature assigned by the IAU.

Maybe you should re-read aa's comments about labels.
Maggnus
3.7 / 5 (6) Sep 20, 2017
If we redefine "flat" as "spherical" and "sun" as "earth"
and "earth" as "sun" your statement would be true.

I think Richard Reynman really nailed the difference between science and label when he said:
"If you memorize all the names of all the birds in the world - you still don't know anything about birds"



And you don't need to know all the names of every planet orbiting the Sun and every known planet orbiting other stars. You just need to know what a planet is. The planetary scientists have that covered.

Exactly. And exactly why the IAU decided to better define the term "planet" and added the term "dwarf-planet".
DrPhiltill
3 / 5 (6) Sep 21, 2017
The IAU is the body charged with officially assigning designations. I don't see why some find this so hard to understand. Any person can call any object anything they want. If you are writing a scientific paper, and want to be understood, you have to use the nomenclature assigned by the IAU.


Nonsense.I just got done reviewing the use of "planet" in scientific publications since the IAU's 2006 vote. Planetary scientists have largely ignored the IAU definition and continue calling bodies like Europa, Titan, Ceres and Pluto "planets". This is widespread. I can show you hundreds of examples published in top scientific journals.
DrPhiltill
3.7 / 5 (3) Sep 21, 2017
Also, the IAU failed to follow its own rules when it adopted the definition of a planet. The working rules state that the text of resolutions should be made available before the meeting for adequate review by the relevant community. This text was created "on the fly" and was approved without consensus of the planetary scientists. Further, no prior IAU definition was ever adopted as "resolved". All prior definitions were "recommended". The 2006 GA went on a wild, unprecedented tangent when it broke the IAU processes and then "resolved" a definition. It's no wonder so many planetary scientists are angry and reject it.
SlartiBartfast
2.6 / 5 (5) Sep 21, 2017
Also, the IAU failed to follow its own rules when it adopted the definition of a planet. The working rules state that the text of resolutions should be made available before the meeting for adequate review by the relevant community. This text was created "on the fly" and was approved without consensus of the planetary scientists. Further, no prior IAU definition was ever adopted as "resolved". All prior definitions were "recommended". The 2006 GA went on a wild, unprecedented tangent when it broke the IAU processes and then "resolved" a definition. It's no wonder so many planetary scientists are angry and reject it.


The tricksy astronomerses! They stole our Precious they did! But we won't let the thieveses get away with it!
maholmes1
3.7 / 5 (3) Sep 21, 2017
Where the IAU messed up was when they voted that a dwarf planet is not a planet but is a distinct category. That is classification, not defining terms.

Your opinion is not relevant.


That's not going to make the boogeyman under your bed go away. Pluto is still a planet to a lot of astronomers and this opinion is still quite relevant.



No, actually it is not. The IAU is the body charged with officially assigning designations. I don't see why some find this so hard to understand. Any person can call any object anything they want. If you are writing a scientific paper, and want to be understood, you have to use the nomenclature assigned by the IAU.

Maybe you should re-read aa's comments about labels.


Maybe you should read DrPhiltill's comments and some other people's comments about definitions. We know what the IAU said. We're just ignoring it.
yaridanjo
1 / 5 (2) Sep 23, 2017
Ifplanet Nine formed about the same time as the rest of the solar planets, Dr. Brown's 700 AU semi-major axis is doomed. It would be cast out by a passing star over the lifetime of the solar system. VanFlandern calculated the maximum safe semi-major to be 490 AU. Vulcan. S semi-major of 291.2 AU and aphelion of 447.6 AU is safe. Bing or Google: "VULCAN REVEALED
A Dangerous New Jovian Sized Body In Our Solar System
yaridanjo
1 / 5 (2) Sep 23, 2017
However, the smaller semi-major axis would permit this body to influence Kuiper Belt Objects, sometimes casting them into 3: 2 Resonate sun grazing orbits. Then they would break up forming comet swarms. Some fragments from these swarms could hit Earth causing Ice Ages. Thus climate data from ice cores and tree rings would offer a way to compute this body's orbital period. Using this and other data, the orbital period was found to be 4969.3 years vs. the therotical 4969.0 year value.
maholmes1
1 / 5 (1) Sep 26, 2017
However, the smaller semi-major axis would permit this body to influence Kuiper Belt Objects, sometimes casting them into 3: 2 Resonate sun grazing orbits. Then they would break up forming comet swarms. Some fragments from these swarms could hit Earth causing Ice Ages. Thus climate data from ice cores and tree rings would offer a way to compute this body's orbital period. Using this and other data, the orbital period was found to be 4969.3 years vs. the therotical 4969.0 year value.


If Planet X even exists.
maholmes1
3 / 5 (2) Sep 26, 2017
Also, the IAU failed to follow its own rules when it adopted the definition of a planet. The working rules state that the text of resolutions should be made available before the meeting for adequate review by the relevant community. This text was created "on the fly" and was approved without consensus of the planetary scientists. Further, no prior IAU definition was ever adopted as "resolved". All prior definitions were "recommended". The 2006 GA went on a wild, unprecedented tangent when it broke the IAU processes and then "resolved" a definition. It's no wonder so many planetary scientists are angry and reject it.


The tricksy astronomerses! They stole our Precious they did! But we won't let the thieveses get away with it!


????
yaridanjo
1 / 5 (2) Sep 26, 2017
Notice that our Vulcan has one of the two possible orbital inclinations proposed for Planet Nine and its semi major axis is very close to the range proposed by the Marcos brothers:

VULCAN REVEALED
VULCAN'S ORBITAL PARAMETERS FROM BLAVATSKY'S THEOSOPHY

The U. Of AZ astronomers estimating that Planet Nine's orbital inclination could be near 18 deg. or 48 deg and Vulcan's 48.44 deg suggests that they are one and the same body.
The Spanish astronomers suggesting that Planet Nine's semi major axis in the 300 to 400 AU range re-enforces the suspicion that both it and Vulcan (semi major axis 291.2 AU) both belong to one and the same body.
yaridanjo
1 / 5 (2) Sep 26, 2017
Notice also that astronomer Forbes in 1880 defined three orbital parameters for a planet in the outer solar system (period, orbital inclination and Longitude of the Ascending Node), and they are very close to the values found for our Vulcan. See:
Table 2 - Vulcan's Orbital Parameters
maholmes1
1 / 5 (1) Sep 27, 2017
Notice that our Vulcan has one of the two possible orbital inclinations proposed for Planet Nine and its semi major axis is very close to the range proposed by the Marcos brothers:

VULCAN REVEALED
VULCAN'S ORBITAL PARAMETERS FROM BLAVATSKY'S THEOSOPHY

The U. Of AZ astronomers estimating that Planet Nine's orbital inclination could be near 18 deg. or 48 deg and Vulcan's 48.44 deg suggests that they are one and the same body.
The Spanish astronomers suggesting that Planet Nine's semi major axis in the 300 to 400 AU range re-enforces the suspicion that both it and Vulcan (semi major axis 291.2 AU) both belong to one and the same body.


Madame Blavatsky?
yaridanjo
1 / 5 (3) Sep 28, 2017
"Madame Blavatsky?"
Right. We have fused Madame Blavatsky's theosophy with IRAS data to get a complete set of orbital parameters. In essence, her theosophy gives us two vectors from the sun to this distant solar body. That defines the orbit plane. Of the first nine IRAS objects found, six were quickly identified. Of the three left, two were later resolved. The remaining one defined a vector from the Sun to that point. That vector falls in the orbit plane. The orbital inclination is 48.44 +/- 0.23 (2 sigma) degrees. Thus there is only one chance in 250 that this is a fortuitous result.
No astronomer would have ever thought of this way to find this unknown solar body. One has to think outside the box. Forbes found three of the orbital parameters in 1880 and they closely agree with our result. Also, independent verification of the period can be found from weather changes induced by comet swarms and 2000 CR105 that operate in a 3:2 resonance with this solar body.
maholmes1
3 / 5 (2) Sep 28, 2017
Yeah, okay.

I'm going to wait until somebody has actually observed this Planet X (or Planet 14 and counting--*not* Planet 9, because that's either Neptune or Pluto). If Planet X actually exists, then this business goes beyond the realm of abstract discussion.
J Doug
1 / 5 (3) Sep 28, 2017
so why not send a probe around the sun to the otherside and have a look
erm...

or just wait till March?


Why the bother, you stupid fuck, if that's all you can come up with? It makes more sense than most of your stupid bull shit; so, that is good.
Uncle Ira
3 / 5 (2) Oct 02, 2017
Please refer to this hypothetical world with the traditional term used for suspected but undiscovered planets, which is Planet X (with X referring to the unknown, not to the number 10). If this object exists, it is NOT the solar system's ninth planet. Pluto's downgrade remains a matter of controversy and debate and should be not be depicted as fact, as many scientists prefer a geophysical planet definition that includes all worlds large enough to be rounded by their own gravity. With this definition, the solar system already has more than nine planets, as dwarf planets are planets too. They are a subclass of planets. That means we have a minimum of 13 planets already, so this one would at minimum be Planet 14.


@ Pluto-Skippette. How you are Chere? I am good thanks for asking. How many years you have been taking a swipe at this windmill, eh" I wonder how many people are signing on to crusade (the ones signing on using beaucoup different names don't count.)
Uncle Ira
3 / 5 (2) Oct 02, 2017
No, I do not have to accept the decision of the IAU, especially when leading planetary scientists such as Alan Stern continue to reject that decision.


What it is you save the Pluto from Cher? Did some space alien try come and take him away?
Uncle Ira
3 / 5 (2) Oct 02, 2017
"Planet 9" IS in fact, Pluto. It really comes down to common usage and many of us, regular folks, Planetary scientists and Amateur Astronomers will NOT relent! Sick and tired of those who have declared themselves "Masters of The Universe" giving them the "Right" to redefine everything!


Tell me Cher, did you and the Pluto-Skippette go to the same Amateur Astronomers' Club? She sure does drag a lot of her acolytes in with her when ever she comes around here to whine about the Pluto.
Uncle Ira
3 / 5 (2) Oct 02, 2017
To take this one step further,.


Well what you know about that? Phil-Skippy and Patrick-Skippy come around just to whine about the IAU. Are you two couyons paying members of the "I Am Smitten By the Pluto-Skippette" club?

Have you ever heard her sing? Oh yeah, she has the youtubes of here singing. You can probably find them by asking Google-Skippy to show you the Pluto-Lady-Laurele-Singing videos. I would really recommend staying away from them though, she could not carry a one quart tune in a five gallon bucket.

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