Image: Lunar module at Tranquility Base

July 21, 2017
Credit: NASA

This photograph of the Lunar Module at Tranquility Base was taken by Neil Armstrong during the Apollo 11 mission, from the rim of Little West Crater on the lunar surface. Armstrong's shadow and the shadow of the camera are visible in the foreground.

When he took this picture, Armstrong was clearly standing above the level of the Lunar Module's footpads. Darkened tracks lead leftward to the deployment area of the Early Apollo Surface Experiments Package (EASEP) and rightward to the TV camera.  This is the furthest distance from the traveled by either astronaut while on the moon.

Credit: NASA

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