Image: North pole of Enceladus

Image: North pole of Enceladus
Credit: NASA

In the north, Enceladus' surface appears to be about as old as any in the solar system. The south, however, is an entirely different story.

The north polar area of Enceladus (313 miles or 504 kilometers across) seen here is heavily cratered, an indication that the surface has not been renewed since quite long ago. But the shows signs of intense geologic activity, most prominently focused around the long fractures known as "tiger stripes" that spray gas and from the moon.

This view looks toward the leading side of Enceladus. North on Enceladus is up and rotated 38 degrees to the left. The image was taken in with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Nov. 27, 2016.

The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 20,000 miles (32,000 kilometers) from Enceladus and at a Sun-Enceladus-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 85 degrees. Image scale is 620 feet (190 meters) per pixel.


Explore further

Image: Potentially hospitable Enceladus

More information: For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit saturn.jpl.nasa.gov
The Cassini imaging team homepage is at ciclops.org
Provided by NASA
Citation: Image: North pole of Enceladus (2017, May 4) retrieved 22 October 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-05-image-north-pole-enceladus.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
5 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more