'Firefall' phenomenon wows visitors to Yosemite's El Capitan

'Firefall' phenomenon wows visitors to Yosemite's El Capitan
In this Feb. 16, 2010, file photo, a shaft of sunlight creates a glow near Horsetail Fall, in Yosemite National Park, Calif. Mother Nature is again putting on a show at California's Yosemite National Park, where every February the setting sun draws a narrow sliver on a waterfall to make it glow like a cascade of molten lava. The phenomenon known as "firefall" draws scores of photographers to the spot, which flows down the granite face of the park's famed rock formation, El Capitan. (Eric Paul Zamora/The Fresno Bee via AP, File)

Mother Nature is again putting on a show at California's Yosemite National Park, where every February the setting sun draws a narrow sliver of light on a waterfall to make it glow like a cascade of molten lava.

The phenomenon known as "firefall" draws scores of photographers to a spot near Horsetail Fall, which flows down the granite face of the park's famed rock formation, El Capitan.

Capturing the sight is a challenge. Horsetail Fall only flows in the winter or spring, when there is enough rain and snow. The sun lights up the fall for only about two minutes at dusk for a few days in February.

Some photographers have had success this year as pictures of the glowing falls are showing up on social media.


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Citation: 'Firefall' phenomenon wows visitors to Yosemite's El Capitan (2017, February 15) retrieved 24 May 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2017-02-firefall-phenomenon-wows-visitors-yosemite.html
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