Paris bans old cars from streets in pollution crackdown

Authorities in Paris are making efforts to clean up the city's polluted air
Authorities in Paris are making efforts to clean up the city's polluted air

Paris cracked down Friday on ageing polluting cars, with vehicles registered before 1997 no longer allowed on the streets from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm on weekdays.

Dozens of police were on duty to warn motorists that driving their would soon land them with a fine of 35 euros ($39).

The move is a part of efforts by Paris city hall to clean up its air, which regularly violates EU norms and is estimated to cut six to eight months off the life expectancy of residents.

Cars older than 10 years are estimated to cause half of the city's air pollution.

A ban on thin plastic bags at checkout counters also went into force on Friday.


Explore further

Pedestrians take over Champs-Elysees as Paris goes green

© 2016 AFP

Citation: Paris bans old cars from streets in pollution crackdown (2016, July 1) retrieved 16 September 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-07-paris-cars-streets-pollution-crackdown.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
34 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Jul 01, 2016
Why not make a law to ban poor people from driving to work?

Plenty of people need mid 90's cars to make a living, because they're cheap to maintain and reliable to operate.

Jul 01, 2016
I think that's what they've just done, Eikka. First step toward moving poor people out of the city entirely.

.. no longer allowed on the streets from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm on weekdays.


So if you have an old car, you can use it at night, for pleasure, but if you want to drive to work, or use it to work, you're screwed. It takes up a parking place all day.

Very regressive, in terms of hardship imposed versus income.

In the spirit of Liberté, égalité, fraternité, why not ban all cars from Paris, except commerically licensed vehicles?

It's a rhetorical question: I know the answer.

Jul 01, 2016
I recall their attempt to ban log fires and can't help but imagine that the powers that be are yearning for another revolution.
I wonder, in this case, what the equivalent would be for "Let them eat cake".

Jul 01, 2016
Very regressive, in terms of hardship imposed versus income.


Methinks there will be a large surge of demand for 1997+ model E100 chassis Toyota Corollas in Paris.

Same car was made from 1991-1999 in different parts of the world. It's basically the passenger car equivalent of the Toyota pickup - can't kill them, they just keep going and going. Probably the cheapest car there is to own and maintain because it's so reliable and the parts are ubiquituous and standard, and you can perform the maintenance yourself without fancy computer readouts - it's all in the Haynes manual.

Also points out the futility of the law. The exact same cars were made before and after 1997 with no differences in emissions controls. The older ones are statistically more likely to be more broken, but they all have to go through "Controle Technique" with emissions tests every year anyhow.

Jul 01, 2016
but if you want to drive to work, or use it to work, you're screwed.

You ever tried driving through Paris? During rush-hour? You're not going to get anywhere, anyways (unless you ride a moped).
There's also precious little parking space.

However, Paris has an excellent train and metro system. That's how most people get to work

...or by bike. In the past few years the Vélib has changed how people get around quite a lot. It's a bike sharing system where you pay a base subscription. Taking a bike from one of the stations is free for the first 30/45 minutes -depending on pass- (which is more than most people need to get anywhere in the city)

Perfect way to get around as a tourist, too..as you pay a measly 8 Euros for a 7 day pass. (and less than 40 Euros for using the system for an entire year)

Jul 01, 2016
Same thing goes on in the US, but we have smog tests instead. You can't get registered if you don't pass the smog test. Driving without a registration sticker will get you pulled over. It's a pretty hefty fine, too.

Meanwhile,
You ever tried driving through Paris? During rush-hour?
Yes. Shudder. Ever heard of the Arc de Traffique? It has like a five-lane traffic circle around it, and those coming in have the right-of-way. Think about it.

Jul 01, 2016
Yes. Shudder. Ever heard of the Arc de Traffique?

Been there. Done that. If I ever run out of ideas I'm going to open up a gas station at the center of that 'roundabout'...once you're in the innermost lane you'll never get out.

Same thing goes on in the US, but we have smog tests instead.

In germany we have different color stickers (red, yellow, green) depending how much exhaust the car produces. There's already some cities that will only allow the green ones to enter. I'm still frequently in Stuttgart and it has markedly improved the air quality from when I was a kid.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more