Greenpeace denounces Cameroon for exporting 'stolen' timber

Britain, Belgium and the Netherlands all consider timber from Cameroon as "high risk" and require strict diligence sta
Britain, Belgium and the Netherlands all consider timber from Cameroon as "high risk" and require strict diligence standards from importing firms

Greenpeace on Thursday condemned the sale of illegally logged timber from Cameroon, saying the west African country's main log exporter was involved in the trade.

A Greenpeace statement said the Cameroonian log exporter CCT sourced timber from La Socamba, a company logging several kilometres (miles) outside its designated area, and then sold it in Europe and China.

The CCT and its suppliers are now facing an audit probe, Greenpeace said.

"Greenpeace Africa takes note of the audit of CCT's practices -– but stresses that this process should be independent and transparent, and that CCT suppliers are properly sanctioned when illegal activities are confirmed," said Eric Ini, Greenpeace Africa forest campaigner.

Britain, Belgium and the Netherlands all consider timber from Cameroon as "high risk" and require strict diligence standards from importing firms.

Greenpeace did not specify the amount of "stolen wood" felled but said La Socamba had been engaged in for at least a year.

The group said its "investigations in China in July 2014 and March 2015 revealed the presence of huge amounts of CCT logs in the port of Zhangjiagang in Jiangsu province," including logs with La Socamba's marks.

Greenpeace said Belgium was the European Union's main importer of Cameroonian wood.

"Cameroon's forests are among the most species-rich in the Congo basin, containing the region's most biologically diverse forests, providing valuable habitat for endangered Western Lowland Gorillas, chimpanzees and forest elephants, amongst other species," Greenpeace said.

"Unsustainable and illegal logging in these forests is leading to deforestation, destruction of the ecosystem and diminished resilience to climate change."


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Citation: Greenpeace denounces Cameroon for exporting 'stolen' timber (2016, May 27) retrieved 18 October 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-05-greenpeace-denounces-cameroon-exporting-stolen.html
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May 27, 2016
"Greenpeace Africa takes note of the audit of CCT's practices -– but stresses that this process should be independent and transparent,


This reminds me of an old and a bit obscure "incident" with Greenpeace back in 1995 which has been censored from wikipedia by guess who.

http://www.theful...ent_tree

Greenpeace stole the stump of a fallen tree next to a road near a farm in Finland, shipped it to Austria, and used it in demonstrations claiming that the Finns are clear-cutting their old-growth nature sanctuaries and the 290 year old stump was taken as evidence from such a logging area - as a propaganda against paper and timber imports.

Not to make slight of the issue of illegal logging, but any time Greenpeace talks about illegal logging, it's best to check it's not Greenpeace itself that is doing it. The whole organization is a quasi-legal panhandling operation that simply pretends to care about the environment.

May 27, 2016
Or the case where Greenpeace published a picture in their German magazine, Greenpeace Magazin (6/2005), with the text:

"19,000,000 tonnes of paper a year are consumed in Germany. Every fifth tree in the world is falling for paper"

"Clearcutting at the Arctic Circle: a remnant of the forest area on the northern Finnish Peurakairasee."

http://personal.i..._yhd.htm
http://www.veikko...t/?cat=1 (more info in german)

Actually, the picture is of a large snow-covered bog with a handful of trees standing on the dry spots.

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