Cambodia rescues half a tonne of smuggled tortoises, pythons

Cambodian authorities take pictures of smuggled elongated tortoises after the animals were confiscated in Kandal province on Mar
Cambodian authorities take pictures of smuggled elongated tortoises after the animals were confiscated in Kandal province on March 29, 2016

Cambodian authorities rescued more than half a tonne of live tortoises and pythons stolen by smugglers, a forestry official said Tuesday, the latest haul in a country with a thriving illegal wildlife trade.

The animals—102 elongated and 17 pythons—weighed a total of 570 kilos.

They were confiscated Monday afternoon from a cargo truck in Cambodia's Kandal province, forestry official Y Sophy told AFP.

"They were being transported to Phnom Penh where they would then be smuggled to Vietnam," he said, adding the creatures were scooped up from Cambodia's Battambang province.

No arrests were made as the truck's driver fled after being pulled over, the official said.

The rescued tortoises and pythons are now with a conservation group that will release them back into the wild.

The elongated tortoise is listed as an endangered species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

It faces dire over-harvesting for food and Asia's animal trade, which fuels a regional demand for exotic pets and traditional medicine.

Cambodia's for trafficked wildlife is enabled by corrupt authorities and weak legislation in a country rich with biodiversity.


Explore further

Rare sun bears found abandoned in Cambodia factory

© 2016 AFP

Citation: Cambodia rescues half a tonne of smuggled tortoises, pythons (2016, March 29) retrieved 14 October 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-03-cambodia-tonne-smuggled-tortoises-pythons.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
119 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more