Hubble watches the icy blue wings of Hen 2-437

February 15, 2016
Credit: ESA (European Space Agency)/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt

In this cosmic snapshot, the spectacularly symmetrical wings of Hen 2-437 show up in a magnificent icy blue hue. Hen 2-437 is a planetary nebula, one of around 3,000 such objects known to reside within the Milky Way.

Located within the faint northern constellation of Vulpecula (The Fox), Hen 2-437 was first identified in 1946 by Rudolph Minkowski, who later also discovered the famous and equally beautiful M2-9 (otherwise known as the Twin Jet Nebula). Hen 2-437 was added to a catalog of over two decades later by astronomer and NASA astronaut Karl Gordon Henize.

Planetary nebulae such as Hen 2-437 form when an aging low-mass star—such as the sun—reaches the final stages of life. The star swells to become a red giant, before casting off its gaseous outer layers into space. The star itself then slowly shrinks to form a white dwarf, while the expelled gas is slowly compressed and pushed outwards by stellar winds.

As shown by its remarkably beautiful appearance, Hen 2-437 is a bipolar —the material ejected by the dying star has streamed out into space to create the two icy blue lobes pictured here.

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katesisco
1 / 5 (5) Feb 15, 2016
I suggest that is exactly what has already happened to Sol, our sun. Its expanded red giant phase I termed "Beetle Sun" before it imploded into Sol. I add that the expelled 'dirty gases' metal-contaminated gases --were expelled to become the rocky planets inside the Beetle Sun original envelope.
Later, following Milton-DeGrazie and the Electrical Universe crew, inter-planetary lightening bolts expended some of the original magnetic energy forcing alterations into gravity.
antialias_physorg
3.9 / 5 (7) Feb 15, 2016
Its expanded red giant phase I termed "Beetle Sun" before it imploded into Sol.

And how do you explain that there are inner planets that would have been well inside such a red giant phase? Where did they come from? Or that the sun is NOT a white dwarf remnant? Or that the metallicity of the sun does not have the characteristic of a post-red giant phase star? Or that we don't see this disc of expelled gasses (it would be blindingly obvious against the CMBR)? Or...

Man...your 'theory' is more full of holes than a swiss cheese with all the cheese removed.
Solon
1 / 5 (2) Feb 15, 2016
Looks like a classic flux tube pinch.
bschott
1 / 5 (2) Feb 16, 2016
The star swells to become a red giant, before casting off its gaseous outer layers into space. The star itself then slowly shrinks to form a white dwarf, while the expelled gas is slowly compressed and pushed outwards by stellar winds.


If only there was a phrase to describe this formation theory...ahhh there it is!

Man...your 'theory' is more full of holes than a swiss cheese with all the cheese removed.


Apparently the mainstream theory is that "the stellar wind" only "blows" in two directions....and can somehow create the defined boundaries we see in the above image. It's a very precise "wind".

antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (3) Feb 16, 2016
Apparently the mainstream theory is that "the stellar wind" only "blows" in two directions

Bipolar outflows aren't magic (almost: they are the results of intense magnetic fields)
https://en.wikipe..._outflow
bschott
1 / 5 (2) Feb 16, 2016
Bipolar outflows aren't magic (almost: they are the results of intense magnetic fields)


Yes...I know.

You would think they may have mentioned that instead of the "stellar wind". Did you say "almost" because of the similarity in appearance between the words "magic" and "magnetic"?

I only ask because it seems the mainstream has a similar understanding about both....

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