Three Saturnian moons in one image

Triple Play

What looks like a pair of Saturnian satellites is actually a trio upon close inspection.

Here, Cassini has captured Enceladus (313 miles or 504 kilometers across) above the rings and Rhea (949 miles or 1,527 kilometers across) below. The comparatively tiny speck of Atlas (19 miles or 30 kilometers across) can also be seen just above and to the left of Rhea, and just above the thin line of Saturn's F ring.

This view looks toward the unilluminated side of the rings from about 0.34 degrees below the .

The image was taken in with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Sept. 24, 2015.

The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 1.8 million miles (2.8 million kilometers) from Rhea. Image scale on Rhea is 10 miles (16 kilometers) per pixel. The distance to Enceladus was 1.3 million miles (2.1 million kilometers) for a scale of 5 miles (8 kilometers) per pixel. The distance to Atlas was 1.5 million miles (2.4 million) kilometers) for an image scale at Atlas of 9 miles (14 kilometers) per pixel.


Explore further

Image: Enceladus and Saturn's rings

More information: For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit saturn.jpl.nasa.gov or www.nasa.gov/cassini

The Cassini imaging team homepage is at ciclops.org

Provided by NASA
Citation: Three Saturnian moons in one image (2016, January 5) retrieved 14 December 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-01-saturnian-moons-image.html
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