Floating anti-plastic waste dam to be tested in North Sea

December 30, 2015
The build-up of plastic waste in the oceans can be deadly for marine life
The build-up of plastic waste in the oceans can be deadly for marine life

A revolutionary floating dam that traps plastic bags, bottles and other waste choking the world's oceans will be tested at sea for the first time in 2016, the Ocean Cleanup foundation said.

"It will be the first time our design will be put to the test in openwaters," the foundation said of the 100 metre-long (328 feet) barrier segment that will be deployed 23 kilometres off the coast of The Netherlands in the second quarter of the year.

Most ocean waste collection programmes use boats to scour the surf for the plastic flotsam and jetsam in which dolphins, seals and other sea creatures become entangled.

Ocean Cleanup's barrier uses currents to passively ensnare waves of garbage —while allowing fish and other through.

The foundation said the goal of the North Sea test, which comes after earlier tests in controlled environments on Dutch lakes, was "to monitor the effects of real-life sea conditions, with a focus on waves and currents".

Apart from spinning a deadly web for marine life waste is also ingested by some creatures, with turtles for example mistaking for jellyfish.

The contaminants then enter the food chain, where they are suspected of links to cancer, infertility and other health risks.

By 2020, the Ocean Clean project hopes to have installed a 100-kilometre-long V-shaped floating barrier in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch—a vortex in the North Pacific where trash collects.

Each arm of the V would consist of a screen three metres deep that blocks waste and directs it to a central point where it can be collected for recycling.

Explore further: Boaters mapping Pacific garbage to arrive in San Francisco

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7 comments

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F111F
1 / 5 (2) Dec 30, 2015
I suspect there's a mix up between converting speed and length. 100 meters is not 62 miles...100kph is (assuming converting kph to mph).
Uncle Ira
4.2 / 5 (5) Dec 30, 2015
I suspect there's a mix up between converting speed and length.


I suspect you read some different article. This one does not say anything about speed. It says,,,,

the 100 metre-long (328 feet) barrier segment


And they cyphered that out right, don't you think?

100 meters is not 62 miles...


You must still be on the wrong article. There ain't nothing in it about miles. Or 62 anythings.

100kph is (assuming converting kph to mph).


I don't think the dam is going to work to good if you try to move him around that fast, eh? Seriously, are you on the right article?
rockwolf1000
5 / 5 (2) Dec 31, 2015
@ira
I don't think the dam is going to work to good if you try to move him around that fast, eh? Seriously, are you on the right article?


Perhaps they edited the article before you and I read it because I don't see 62 anything either.

Bizarre!
Shootist
1 / 5 (3) Dec 31, 2015
Editors,

choking the world's oceans


selling your product through gross overstatement? Have you no honor?
antigoracle
1 / 5 (5) Dec 31, 2015
I wonder how much more sea life will be trapped in that dam trap.
Steve 200mph Cruiz
5 / 5 (5) Jan 03, 2016
Shootist,
Environmental stewardship is the honorable thing to do.

But you don't think anything has consequences, that's why you don't give a damn about anything.
Luckily there are real men in this world who actually fight for a better tomorrow, even knowing a little weasel like you could choose to destroy their life's work in a week.
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (2) Jan 04, 2016
I wonder how much more sea life will be trapped in that dam trap.

You mean as opposed to sea life that gets trapped in the waste (not to mention the sea life that comes in contact and doesn't get trapped - but ends up poisoned by all those leached out chemicals on your dinner table)?
Do you realize that once the waste is removed the dams are removed as well and no sea life gets trappped at all?

Luckily there are real men in this world who actually fight for a better tomorrow, even knowing a little weasel like you could choose to destroy their life's work in a week.

Yes. Some people just need cleaning up after them.
Most people learn to do so at some point in their lives, but some never do. It's part of growing up. (Some just grow old - but never grow up)

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