NASA image: A precocious black hole

A precocious black hole
Credit: Illustration by M. Helfenbein, Yale University / OPAC

In July 2015, researchers announced the discovery of a black hole, shown in the above illustration, that grew much more quickly than its host galaxy.

The discovery calls into question previous assumptions on the development of galaxies. The black hole was originally discovered using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, and was then detected in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and by ESA's XMM-Newton and NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory.

Benny Trakhtenbrot, from ETH Zurich's Institute for Astronomy, and an international team of astrophysicists, performed a follow-up observation of this black hole using the 10 meter Keck telescope in Hawaii and were surprised by the results. The data, collected with a new instrument, revealed a giant black hole in an otherwise normal, distant galaxy, called CID-947.


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Ancient black hole defied rules of galaxy formation

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Citation: NASA image: A precocious black hole (2015, November 30) retrieved 21 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-11-nasa-image-precocious-black-hole.html
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Dec 01, 2015
Even the title is not clarified. What was its mass, how fast did it grown, how fast for the host? Useless post

Jan 19, 2016
Because the core star leads galactic growth, since it spawns much of the material used to form the stars. If interested, see my comments thereunder. If not, mark me down and be happy!

http://phys.org/n...tml#nRlv

Jan 19, 2016
More:
discovery of a black hole, shown in the above illustration, that grew much more quickly than its host galaxy.


http://phys.org/n...axy.html

http://phys.org/n...als.html

http://phys.org/n...ies.html

http://phys.org/n...axy.html

http://phys.org/n...tml#nRlv


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