Why did Hurricane Patricia become a monster so quickly?

Why did Hurricane Patricia become a monster so quickly?
This image taken Friday, Oct. 23, 2015, from the International Space Station shows Hurricane Patricia. The Category 5 storm, the strongest recorded in the Western Hemisphere, barreled toward southwestern Mexico Friday. (Scott Kelly/NASA via AP)

Hurricane Patricia zoomed from tropical storm to record-beater in 30 hours flat like a jet-fueled sports car.

Why? The Pacific storm had just the right ingredients.

Plenty of warm water provided the energy what meteorologists call explosive intensification. The air was much moister than usual, adding yet more fuel. And at the same time, upper-level crosswinds—called shear—that restrain a hurricane from strengthening were missing for much of Thursday, meteorologists said.

"I was really astounded," said MIT meteorology professor Kerry Emanuel. "It was over the juiciest part of the eastern Pacific."

El Nino's fingerprints are all over this, meteorologists agreed. And while it fits perfectly into climate scientists' theories of what a warming world will be like, they say global warming can't quite be blamed—yet.

At 10 p.m. EDT Wednesday, Patricia was a off Mexico with 65 mph winds that forecasters expected to intensify rapidly. In fact, one forecast gave it a 97 percent chance of getting stronger fast.

But it strengthened so quickly that many were surprised, said Robert Rogers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Hurricane Research Division.

By 4 a.m. EDT Friday Patricia's winds were a record for hurricanes: 200 mph.

"Incredible. You don't see many like this," said former hurricane hunter meteorologist Jeff Masters, meteorology director of the private Weather Underground. "In fact in the Western Hemisphere, we've never seen anything like this."

In the Eastern Hemisphere, satellite estimates measured Typhoon Nancy at 215 mph in 1961 and Typhoon Violet at 205 mph also in 1961, but satellite measurements aren't as precise, Masters said. (Hurricanes, typhoons and cyclones are all the same thing with different names.)

Why did Hurricane Patricia become a monster so quickly?
This satellite image taken at 10:45 a.m. EDT on Friday, Oct. 23, 2015, and released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows Hurricane Patricia moving over Mexico's Pacific Coast. Hurricane Patricia headed toward southwestern Mexico Friday as a monster Category 5 storm, the strongest ever in the Western Hemisphere that forecasters said could make a "potentially catastrophic landfall" later in the day. (NOAA via AP)

Super Typhoon Haiyan that devastated the Philippines in 2013 was measured at 195 mph via satellite. However, most storms don't have accurate measurements because most don't get planes flown into them unless they are a threat, Emanuel said.

He's part of an experiment with the U.S. Navy, dropping measuring devices from planes into Patricia for the past three days.

Worldwide, this is the ninth Category 5 storm this year, which is tied for the second most on record, Masters said. Normal years are around five to six. A Category 5 storm has winds of 157 mph or higher.

The eastern and northern Pacific regions have had more tropical storms than usual this season; the Atlantic has had less.

Why did Hurricane Patricia become a monster so quickly?
This satellite image taken at 9:30 a.m. EDT on Friday, Oct. 23, 2015, and released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows Hurricane Patricia. Hurricane Patricia headed toward southwestern Mexico Friday as a monster Category 5 storm, the strongest ever in the Western Hemisphere that forecasters said could make a "potentially catastrophic landfall" later in the day. (NOAA/RAMMB/CIRA via AP)

That's a classic signature of the weather pattern called El Nino—with warmer waters to feed storms and favorable winds in the Pacific and unfavorable winds in the Atlantic, Masters and others said.

Patricia is being fueled by near-record warm 87-degree Pacific waters at the surface that ran warm unusually deep.

Climate science theory says that as the world warms, the most extreme storms will get even stronger and wetter. Patricia's record strength is "consistent with what we say" but there are too few examples to make a scientifically accurate connection, Emanuel said.

Patricia and Haiyan from 2013 may be "warning signs that, hey this could be the future," Masters said.


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NASA analyzes record-breaking Hurricane Patricia

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Oct 24, 2015
Just ask Al Gore.

It was clearly the result of Exxon causing global warming..

The real question is, "what were storms like during the height of the Eocene vs now?"

Just remember, the Eocene ended in a Ice House. I seriously doubt our epoch will be different no matter how much Al Gore wants to cash in on solar panels.

"...indicate that at the maximum of global warmth the atmospheric carbon dioxide values were at 700 – 900 ppm[6] while other proxies such as pedogenic (soil building) carbonate and marine boron isotopes indicate large changes of carbon dioxide of over 2,000 ppm over periods of time of less than 1 million years.[7] Sources for this large influx of carbon dioxide could be attributed to volcanic..."

https://en.wikipe...i/Eocene

Oct 24, 2015
Wow, I almost went into a long typed out analogy about increasing the amplitude of a signal by using an amplifier to increase the maximum peak voltage of a system in order to increase the RMS output, but then I remembered what site I was on.

God hates us, that's the answer.

Oct 24, 2015
Considering it only hit land at 165mph, it isn't even the strongest storm to landfall on Mexico, and the Labor Day storm hit land almost as strong as Patricia's maximum over-water intensity, based on Pressure.

AGW does not appear to be contributing anywhere near enough to storm intensity to overcome an 80 year old record from when CO2 was like 120PPM lower.


Oct 25, 2015
Cat 5 with 200mph winds. Landfall and no reports of damage just lots of rain. Gag order placed on NWS and NOAA. Fake hurricane to support global climate change narrative?

Oct 25, 2015
Wow, a monster storm that has nothing to do with gloBULL warming. So, after the AGW Cult steals trillions on their CO2 lies, we won't have anything left to defend or rebuild from what nature throws at us.

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