Spain's crisis has taken environmental toll: Greenpeace

Greenpeace volunteers hold up a sign saying "Prospecting, No" north of Santa Cruz de Tenerife on June 28, 2014 during
Greenpeace volunteers hold up a sign saying "Prospecting, No" north of Santa Cruz de Tenerife on June 28, 2014 during a simulation of an oil spill, protesting plans for exploration off the coast of the Canary and Baleares Islands

Spain's economic crisis and successive corruption scandals have led to looser environmental regulations which have taken a huge toll on the environment, Greenpeace said in a report published Wednesday.

The environment is "one of the main victims of the crisis" which was sparked by the collapse of a decade-long building boom in 2008. the group said in the 47-page report.

"There are hundreds of corruption cases which have left behind them natural spaces covered in cement and soil contaminated by hazardous waste," the report added.

There were 1,754 court cases involving suspected illegalities related to urban planning decisions in 2011 alone, it said.

The "revolving door" of officials between posts in the public office and the private sector "creates a vicious circle where policies are made to benefit companies," Greenpeace added.

The report analysed the impact of policies put in place by Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy's conservative government since it came to power in 2011 as well as the state of the environment in Spain, the second-most visited nation in Europe after France.

"Laws which were good were eliminated or weakened," a spokesman for the Spanish branch of Greenpeace, Julio Barea, told AFP.

As an example he said the government had "rolled out the red carpet" for fracking and offshore oil exploration.

Several regional governments outlawed hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, but in 2013 Spain's central government used its majority in parliament to pass legislation that overrules regional restrictions on the oil and gas extraction process.

The government also authorised Spanish oil giant Repsol to search for oil near the Canary Islands, a chain of Spanish islands off the coast of Morocco.

The project sparked huge protests by locals and environmentalists in the holiday islands and Repsol in January called off the drilling, citing disappointing results from its surveying.

Greenpeace said Spain, unlike France and Germany, allowed "large scale cultivation" of genetically-modified crops and had slashed the budget for the fight against forest fires.

The environmental group also faulted Spain for allowing traditional fishing to decline. It said the number of people employed in traditional fishing had dropped by 52,000 between 1992 and 2012.


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Citation: Spain's crisis has taken environmental toll: Greenpeace (2015, June 3) retrieved 15 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-06-spain-crisis-environmental-toll-greenpeace.html
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Jun 03, 2015
"Spain's 18,000 wind turbines kill on average 6 – 18 million birds and bats a year."
I dream a day Greenpeace's activists and other Taliban environmentalists out there protesting beneath huge wind farms to protect wildlife and natural spaces.

Jun 05, 2015
"Spain's 18,000 wind turbines kill on average 6 – 18 million birds and bats a year."
I dream a day Greenpeace's activists and other Taliban environmentalists out there protesting beneath huge wind farms to protect wildlife and natural spaces.


Got a source for that data that isn't Tory Aardvark or his pals? All the searches of wind farms that I have reviewed (and it'snot a small number) show bird and bat mortality to be several orders of magnitude less. If your "data" is accurate, that's about 1,000 deaths/turbine/year. The amount of time I have spent at turbine sites would have me picking dead birds out of my hatband on a regular basis. So far I have seen ONE dead bird at a wind site.

Jun 05, 2015
Earthman, I was in the wind turbine fields under the turbines at Altamont only once, taking a CEO of Hawaii Electric on a tour. We saw not a single dead bird in that place where they were operating for a decade already.

I let Willie's stuff go for the same reason I let otto go - they are simple malcontents who thrive on attention and this game of gotcha. But since they do not understand the field, not having worked in it, you will waste all your time dealing with their irrelevancies.

I suggest you look up how long it took to explain the how electricity is produced as kW and billed as kWh, not kW/hr.

Jun 05, 2015
Most of the people believe in what they want to believe, and see what they want to see.
We saw not a single dead bird in that place where they were operating for a decade already.
Dreadful, a bird being slaughtered in midair by wind blade.
http://www.youtub...AzBArYdw

"Birds killed by wind turbines – Pictures –"
https://savetheea...ictures/
"US windfarms kill 10-20 times more than previously thought"
http://savetheeag...ght.html
Images of birds dead by wind blades:
https://www.googl...+turbine


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