Bear cub badly burned in Washington blaze is back in wild

Bear cub badly burned in Washington blaze is back in wild
In this Aug. 4, 2014 file photo, a female bear cub with badly burned paws who had been named Cinder is put into a crate before a flight from East Wenatchee, Wash., to Lake Tahoe, Calif. Now healed after stints at a California wildlife center and the Idaho Black Bear Rehabilitation center near Boise, she weighs about 125 pounds. Washington state Fish and Wildlife officers plan to release Cinder on Wednesday, June 3, 2015 near Wenatchee, Wash. She'll be released with a buddy, a male cub she befriended in rehab. (Don Seabrook/The Wenatchee World via AP, File)

A bear cub found badly burned last summer in the largest wildfire in Washington state history has endured a long recovery but is now back in the wild.

Rich Beausoleil with the state Department of Fish and Wildlife says officials released the 2½-year-old cub nicknamed Cinder on Wednesday morning in a central Washington forest. He says the bear was in good shape and "running like a champ" near Wenatchee.

Cinder was found under a horse trailer after the Carlton Complex fire, her paws so scorched that she was pulling herself along by her elbows.

Now healed after stints at a California wildlife center and the Idaho Black Bear Rehabilitation center near Boise, she weighs about 125 pounds.

Cinder was released with an orphaned she had bonded with during rehab.


Explore further

Black bear on Internet gives birth to cub in Minn. (Update)

© 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

Citation: Bear cub badly burned in Washington blaze is back in wild (2015, June 3) retrieved 19 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-06-cub-badly-washington-blaze-wild.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
40 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Jun 05, 2015
Rescuing, rehabilitating and releasing wild animals back to their natural habitat is the true way to give them a second chance, when possible for the animal of course as some have suffered too much trauma to live and survive in the wild. Cinder and Kaulana's story is wonderful and I wish them the best life in nature. The article suggests this "hard" release straight from the cage to the wild helped with guns and dogs is the end of the story. But I am wondering if and how these animals are being monitored now as only a post release assessment will certify the release was successful. And I find no information indicating there will be any monitoring from now on... Any information I would be grateful!

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more