A few dozen sei whales beached along south Chilean coast

A few dozen sei whales beached along south Chilean coast
This April 21, 2015 photo released by Vreni Haussermann shows sei whales beached on the southern coast of Gulf of Penas, Chile. About 20 whales have been found beached along Chile's southern coastline and officials say they are trying to determine what caused them to wind up on the beach. The International Union for Conservation of Natures lists the sei as an endangered species. (Vreni Haussermann, Huinay Scientific Field Station via AP)

Chilean officials said Friday that a few dozen endangered sei whales have been found beached along the South American country's southern coast.

Foreign scientists discovered the whales on the Gulf of Penas and reported them to the National Fisheries Service. A statement from said there were around 20 whales, while the scientists said they counted more than 30.

It's not unusual to find along Chile's 2,400-mile (4,200-kilometer) coast. However, it's the first time sei whales have been found beached in the country, the Fisheries Service said.

The International Union for Conservation of Natures lists the sei as an endangered species. Adults can be longer than 50 feet (15 meters) and weigh 20 tons or more.

Officials said they were trying to determine what caused the whales to wind up on the beach.

  • A few dozen sei whales beached along south Chilean coast
    This April 21, 2015 photo released by Vreni Haussermann shows sei whales beached on the Gulf of Penas, Chile. About 20 whales have been found beached along Chile's southern coastline and officials say they are trying to determine what caused them to wind up on the beach. The International Union for Conservation of Natures lists the sei as an endangered species. (Vreni Haussermann, Huinay Scientific Field Station via AP)
  • A few dozen sei whales beached along south Chilean coast
    This April 21, 2015 photo released by Vreni Haussermann shows Sei whales beached off the Gulf of Tres Montes, which is part of the Gulf of Penas, Chile. Haussermann, director of Chile's Huinay Scientific Field Station, said she saw 30 whales beached along Chile's southern coastline, in the areas of Golfo Tres Montes and Canal del Castillo. Officials say they are trying to determine what caused them to wind up on the beach. The International Union for Conservation of Natures lists the sei as an endangered species. (Vreni Haussermann, Huinay Scientific Field Station via AP)
  • A few dozen sei whales beached along south Chilean coast
    This April 21, 2015 photo released by Vreni Haussermann shows a sei whale floating in the Gulf of Tres Montes, which is part of the Gulf of Penas, Chile. Haussermann, director of Chile's Huinay Scientific Field Station, said she saw 30 whales beached along Chile's southern coastline, in the areas of Golfo Tres Montes and Canal del Castillo. Officials say they are trying to determine what caused them to wind up on the beach. The International Union for Conservation of Natures lists the sei as an endangered species. (Vreni Haussermann, Huinay Scientific Field Station via AP)

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May 18, 2015
Seismic socalled "surveys! Big Oil is behind this disaster.

Jun 11, 2015
Seismic blastings have coursed theese strandings, just be sure of that.

By the way - please don't rely on this agitator called capt. David Williams. He acts like he's being paid by the oil industry to confuse People concerned about the increasing numbers of whale strandings.

"His" theory about earthquakes making whales stranding is not reliable.

But it is in the opposite way true that increasing oil activities leads to larger scales of earthquakes. Scientists are becoming aware of this fenomen and hopefully science will be able to explain why in the years to come.

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