Dark matter is darker than once thought

March 27, 2015
Composite of X-ray and optical imagery. Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Switzerland/D.Harvey & NASA/CXC/Durham Univ/R.Massey; Optical & Lensing Map: NASA, ESA, D. Harvey (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Switzerland) and R. Massey (Durham University, UK)

This panel of images represents a study of 72 colliding galaxy clusters conducted by a team of astronomers using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope. The research sets new limits on how dark matter - the mysterious substance that makes up most of the matter in the Universe - interacts with itself, as reported in this article. This information could help scientists narrow down the possibilities of what dark matter may be.

Galaxy clusters, the largest objects in the Universe held together by their own gravity, are made up of three main components: stars, clouds of hot gas, and . When galaxy clusters collide, the clouds of gas enveloping the galaxies crash into each other and slow down or stop. The stars are much less affected by the drag from the gas and, because they occupy much less space, they glide past each other like ships passing in the night.

Because the clouds of gas are very hot - millions of degrees - they glow brightly in X-ray light (pink). When combined with visible-light images from Hubble, the team was able to map the post-collision distribution of stars and also of the dark matter (blue). Astronomers can map the distribution of dark matter by analyzing how the light from distant sources beyond the cluster is magnified and distorted by gravitational effects (known as ".")

The collisions in the study happened at different times, and are seen from different angles - some from the side, and others head-on. The clusters in the panel are from left to right and top to bottom: MACS J0416.1-2403, MACS J0152.5-2852, MACS J0717.5+3745, Abell 370, Abell 2744 and ZwCl 1358+62.

This study builds on previous findings involving Chandra and other telescopes, namely the work on the Bullet Cluster and other individual collisions.

Explore further: Galaxy clusters collide—dark matter still a mystery

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18 comments

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Benni
1.3 / 5 (12) Mar 27, 2015
Wait a minute here, how can they even make a statement about "limits on DM" when they continue admitting they don't even know the stuff exists except in their composite bluish purple airbrushed photos?

When you look through a telescope none of that bluish purple halo in the above pictures exists except in the imaginations of someone who wants to believe in something he/she can't proves exists inside the established laws of gravity in General Relativity, you know, you've read it here before: "settled science".
liquidspacetime
1 / 5 (8) Mar 27, 2015
There is evidence of dark matter every time a double slit experiment is performed; it's what waves.

Dark matter has mass. Dark matter physically occupies three dimensional space. Dark matter is physically displaced by the particles of matter which exist in it and move through it.

The Milky Way's halo is not a clump of dark matter anchored to the Milky Way. The Milky Way is moving through and displacing the dark matter.

The Milky Way's halo is the state of displacement of the dark matter.

The Milky Way's halo is the deformation of spacetime.

What is referred to geometrically as the deformation of spacetime physically exists in nature as the state of displacement of the dark matter.

A moving particle has an associated dark matter displacement wave. In a double slit experiment the particle travels through a single slit and the associated wave in the dark matter passes through both.
liquidspacetime
1.2 / 5 (6) Mar 27, 2015
Q. Why is the particle always detected traveling through a single slit in a double slit experiment?
A. The particle always travels through a single slit. It is the associated wave in the dark matter which passes through both.

What ripples when galaxy clusters collide is what waves in a double slit experiment; the dark matter.

Einstein's gravitational wave is de Broglie's wave of wave-particle duality; both are waves in the dark matter.

Dark matter displaced by matter relates general relativity and quantum mechanics.
Tektrix
5 / 5 (6) Mar 27, 2015
"When you look through a telescope none of that bluish purple halo in the above pictures exists . . ."

When someone looks at you and they can't see your name floating above your head, they should just assume you don't exist, then?
Benni
1 / 5 (7) Mar 27, 2015
"When you look through a telescope none of that bluish purple halo in the above pictures exists . . ."

When someone looks at you and they can't see your name floating above your head, they should just assume you don't exist, then?
No, just by looking at me, as we do galaxies which also do not have a halo.

vic1248
not rated yet Mar 27, 2015
What I like the most about NASA's galactic pictures is that hey are always "Patriotic."
Bob Osaka
1.8 / 5 (5) Mar 28, 2015
Look! Pictures of dark matter. Just in time for April Fool's day.
Benni
1.6 / 5 (7) Mar 28, 2015
Look! Pictures of dark matter. Just in time for April Fool's day.

Yeah, isn't that ever the truth. Looks just like a page out of some comic book in which they fake a whole bunch of background effects to just for the purpose of drawing your attention to something they know isn't real.
NMvoiceofreason
4.4 / 5 (7) Mar 29, 2015
Wait a minute here, how can they even make a statement about "limits on DM" when they continue admitting they don't even know the stuff exists except in their composite bluish purple airbrushed photos?

When you look through a telescope none of that bluish purple halo in the above pictures exists except in the imaginations of someone who wants to believe in something he/she can't proves exists inside the established laws of gravity in General Relativity, you know, you've read it here before: "settled science".


Benni, you are misquoting things to "prove" you favorite false talking point - your claim there is no proof dark matter exists. Yet you ignore "Astronomers can map the distribution of dark matter by analyzing how the light from distant sources beyond the cluster is magnified and distorted by gravitational effects". Something is changing the path of light. You may not wish to call it dark matter, but your claim that is doesn't exist is specious at best.
Benni
1 / 5 (7) Mar 29, 2015
Benni, you are misquoting things
OK, so what's the misquote?
to prove you favorite false talking point - your claim there is no proof dark matter exists
And you have proven that DM exists because you have a barrel full of it sitting next to you that you're willing to share with the rest of us?

Yet you ignore "Astronomers can map the distribution of dark matter by analyzing how the light from distant sources beyond the cluster is magnified and distorted by gravitational effects"
Yeah, 99.99999999999% of which is caused by Giant Elliptical galaxies which dwarf in size the largest Spirals.

Something is changing the path of light
No kidding, astronomers call them giant Elliptical Galaxies, ever hear of them?

You may not wish to call it dark matter
Astronomers know better than to confuse the inherent gravity fields of giant Ellipticals with DM, you don't.

but your claim that is doesn't exist is specious at best.
Then hand some over

Benni
1 / 5 (6) Mar 30, 2015
Yet you ignore "Astronomers can map the distribution of dark matter by analyzing how the light from distant sources beyond the cluster is magnified and distorted by gravitational effects"
Yeah, 99.99999999999% of which is caused by Giant Elliptical galaxies which dwarf in size the largest Spirals


Something is changing the path of light
No kidding, astronomers call them giant Elliptical Galaxies, ever hear of them?


You may not wish to call it dark matter
Astronomers know better than to confuse the inherent gravity fields of giant Ellipticals with DM, you don't.


....and not only do you not understand what causes 99.9999999999% of all the gravitational lensing in the Universe, neither does yyz & Imp9. What's the matter with some of you people? Are you really so lazy that you can't take on the study of a few links to study something about Elliptical Galaxies & their propensity to create gravitational lensing?

Tuxford
1 / 5 (1) Mar 30, 2015
Q. Why is the particle always detected traveling through a single slit in a double slit experiment?
A. The particle always travels through a single slit. It is the associated wave in the dark matter which passes through both.


Excellent. Yes, indeed the wave propagates ahead in front of the traveling particle reaction of the underlying etheric matrix, much like a sound wave propagates through air in front of a train. Thus, the interference pattern precedes the passing of the particle through of the slit. Simple.
reset
1 / 5 (3) Mar 31, 2015
but your claim that is doesn't exist is specious at best.


LMFAO!!! Um...there are only "claims" that it does exist....no evidence (lensing is not evidence unless you CHOOSE to interpret it as such....people who understand how to bend light don't do it with gravity....so choosing to interpet it this way is nonsensical).

The choice to interpret observations from the standpoint that gravity is responsible for them has made alot of unintentionally ignorant people (due to lack of tech at the time) perpetuate the myth called the standard model. It "worked" briefly enough for us to build the tech to prove that it isn't a valid representation of reality, and now those who refuse to let it die have been teaching the smartest people on earth how to make a patchwork quilt out of what is clearly an article destined for the trash can. Math is a nice distraction.
NMvoiceofreason
1 / 5 (1) Mar 31, 2015

It is always nice to beat up on the Standard Model. I do it every afternoon, just because it is fun. After all, it is only an approximation (accurate to 17 decimal places). But there are things it doesn't know about, such as gravity. We can claim the dark matter evidence is error bars in the observation of galaxies, but that doesn't correct for the gravitic effect we can measure on the speed. Unless you subscribe to MOND, which has correction factors to make it all go away.

According to Benni, just using the right photoshop filter will make al the evidence go away too.
NMvoiceofreason
1 / 5 (1) Mar 31, 2015
Subscribe to MOND instead:

http://phys.org/n...ior.html
shavera
3.4 / 5 (5) Mar 31, 2015
Benni believes that lenses don't exist because you can't see them. You can see light bend in different ways. But you can't infer there's a lens there. That's fallacious.

Reset believes that because (s)he doesn't know how to do something, no one else does either. Disregard direct observations of light bending in the presence of gravity. Nothing to be seen there, move along.
reset
1 / 5 (3) Mar 31, 2015
Shavera is perfect example of the misinterpretation I was referring to, however I have caused lights path to change many times already today by forcing it to interact with a magnetic field.

If you want to assume gravity bends light good luck understanding how and why the universe is structured the way it is...probably have to add a fudge factor of non detecable mass outnumbering actual matter by a 3:1 ratio just to keep the math of motion working properly...oh wait....
liquidspacetime
not rated yet Apr 01, 2015


Excellent. Yes, indeed the wave propagates ahead in front of the traveling particle reaction of the underlying etheric matrix, much like a sound wave propagates through air in front of a train. Thus, the interference pattern precedes the passing of the particle through of the slit. Simple.


NON-LINEAR WAVE MECHANICS
A CAUSAL INTERPRETATION
by
LOUIS DE BROGLIE

"the random perturbations to which the particle would be constantly subjected, and which would have the probability of presence in terms of W, arise from the interaction of the particle with a "subquantic medium" which escapes our observation and is entirely chaotic, and which is everywhere present in what we call "empty space"."

The "subquantic medium" is the aether.

'The pilot-wave dynamics of walking droplets
https://www.youtu...0ygr08tE

'Yves Couder Explains Wave/Particle Duality via Silicon Droplets [Through the Wormhole]'
https://www.youtu...Wv5dqSKk

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