Agency: 6 workers inhaled uranium at Wyoming mine

December 5, 2014 byMead Gruver

(AP)—The Nuclear Regulatory Commission says six workers at a Wyoming uranium mine inhaled the radioactive element while cleaning up a spill inside a building.

The federal agency alleges the workers' urine afterward tested positive for uranium.

The spill and cleanup of 1,500 pounds of yellowcake happened just over a year ago at the remote Lost Creek uranium mine in southern Wyoming. Yellowcake is a precursor of enriched uranium.

The regulatory commission issued a violation notice Nov. 14 against mine owner Ur-Energy (YOU'-are Energy) for failing to issue a permit to clean up the spill.

Ur-Energy President Wayne Heili said Friday the workers' exposures were nowhere near their annual dose limits, and they had no ill effects.

He says mine officials didn't stop to complete paperwork before cleaning up the .

Explore further: US finds no pollution from Mexico mine spill

Related Stories

New toxic spill traced to Mexico mine

September 22, 2014

Civil protection authorities have confirmed new toxic spills in northwestern Mexico, where a massive acid spill from a copper mine contaminated waterways.

US tests for toxic spill from Mexico mine

September 24, 2014

US authorities are testing a river in Arizona for possible cross-border contamination from a toxic mine spill in northwestern Mexico, an official said Tuesday.

Toxic spill from zinc mine in Peru

September 3, 2012

(AP)—Peruvian authorities say wastewater laced with heavy metals from a major zinc mine has spilled into a tributary of the Amazon, contaminating at least six miles of the waterway.

Workers preparing to enter New Mexico nuke dump

March 10, 2014

Specially trained workers are finalizing plans to enter the nation's only underground nuclear waste dump after two separate incidents forced its closure weeks ago, including a leak that exposed more than a dozen workers to ...

Recommended for you

New insight into Greenland's melting glaciers

July 17, 2018

New research into Greenland's glaciers will help bring accurate sea level rise forecasts – which are crucial in preparing for the impacts of climate change—a step closer.

Thawing permafrost microbiomes fuel climate change

July 16, 2018

A University of Queensland-led international study could lead to more accurate predictions or the rate of global warming from greenhouse gas emissions produced by thawing permafrost in the next 100 years.

4 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

gkam
1 / 5 (2) Dec 05, 2014
One might want to check into if any Neutrons are emitted by the yellowcake, or Alpha particles, the two bad ones for internal damage. If they inhaled it, they may get lung cancer.
dan42day
not rated yet Dec 05, 2014
An average of 27 coal miners died each year from on-the-job injuries in the U.S. over the last 7 years (up to 2013). Couldn't find anything about 2014. Apparently it's not news if it's not NUCLEAR!
gkam
1 / 5 (2) Dec 05, 2014
If you got nuclear news, you would be aware of the three disasters in Fukushima, still bleeding high-level waste into the Pacific Ocean.
alfie_null
5 / 5 (2) Dec 06, 2014
An average of 27 coal miners died each year from on-the-job injuries in the U.S. over the last 7 years (up to 2013). Couldn't find anything about 2014. Apparently it's not news if it's not NUCLEAR!

If there was someone promoting the safety of the coal mining, I must have missed the presentation. With the centuries of experience we have mining coal, I doubt anyone questions its safety anymore.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.