Hawaii lava's slow forward creep stalls—for now

Hawaii lava's slow forward creep stalls -- for now
This photo taken on Nov. 1, 2014, and released by the U.S. Geological Survey shows a "toe" of Pahoehoe lava oozing out of the edge of the main flow, about 328 yards upslope of the leading edge of the flow, near the town of Pahoa, Hawaii. The tip of the flow that remains halted in a Pahoa farmer's yard is now cool to the touch, but a few hundred yards upslope an active stretch of lava is "inflating," or filling with fresh lava. (AP Photo/U.S. Geological Survey)

Lava threatening a rural Hawaii town has stopped its slow, forward advance—for now.

Hawaii County Civil Defense officials said Thursday the front of the lava flow has been stalled for about a week. It's still about 480 feet from Pahoa Village Road, which goes through downtown.

It's possible the lava could start to be more active in the coming days. Officials are continuing to monitor other parts of the flow where the lava has branched out.

Residents in the Big Island's Puna district have had weeks to prepare for the slow-moving lava from Kilauea volcano.

On Oct. 26, the flow crossed a country street on the edge of Pahoa. Since then, it's smothered part of a cemetery and burned down a garden shed. The also has also burned tires, some and vegetation.

  • Hawaii lava's slow forward creep stalls -- for now
    This photo taken on Oct. 31, 2014, and released by the U.S. Geological Survey, shows a hole left behind by a large tree that was surrounded by lava, burned through at its base and collapsed onto the solidified flow surface, near the town of Pahoa, Hawaii. The end of the tree trunk is glowing, and flames from burning wood are emanating from the hole. Geologists say this represents an under-appreciated hazard of the lava flow field, as trees that were surrounded by lava can fall long after the leading edge has passed by. The tip of the flow that remains halted in a Pahoa farmer's yard is now cool to the touch, but a few hundred yards upstream an active stretch of lava is "inflating," or filling with fresh lava. (AP Photo/U.S. Geological Survey)
  • Hawaii lava's slow forward creep stalls -- for now
    This photo taken on Nov. 1, 2014, and released from the U.S. Geological Survey, shows small breakouts from an inflating Pahoehoe lava lobe in a privately owned orchard near the town of Pahoa, Hawaii. The tip of the flow that remains halted in a Pahoa farmer's yard is now cool to the touch, but a few hundred yards upstream an active stretch of lava is "inflating," or filling with fresh lava. (AP Photo/U.S. Geological Survey)

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Citation: Hawaii lava's slow forward creep stalls—for now (2014, November 6) retrieved 14 November 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-11-hawaii-lava-stallsfor.html
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