EPA approves new weed killer for engineered crops

October 15, 2014 by Mary Clare Jalonick

(AP)—The Environmental Protection Agency has approved a new version of a popular weed killer to be used on genetically modified corn and soybeans.

The EPA says Wednesday that it will allow the use of a 2,4-D weed killer called Enlist Duo. The herbicide is designed to be used on corn and soybeans grown with engineered seeds approved by the Agriculture Department last month. When used together, farmers can spray the fields after the plants emerge, killing the weeds but leaving crops unharmed.

The agriculture industry has anxiously awaited the approvals, as many weeds have become resistant to glyphosate, an herbicide commonly used on and soybeans now.

Critics say they're concerned the increased use of 2,4-D could endanger public health and more study on the chemical is needed.

Explore further: US government might deregulate corn, soybean seeds

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