N. America treated to partial solar eclipse Thurs.

October 21, 2014 by Marcia Dunn

North Americans, get set for the fourth and final eclipse of the year.

On Thursday, most of North America will have prime viewing of a . The new moon will hide part of the sun from view. The eclipse will unfold slowly following its start near the Kamchatka Peninsula in far eastern Russia.

The best views will be in the U.S. Northwest and northern Canada, especially Prince of Wales Island. New England and the Canadian Maritime provinces will miss out.

In the eastern half of the U.S., the eclipse will occur near sunset.

Sky gazers are urged to protect their eyes with special filtered glasses. Regular sunglasses are not good enough.

This makes for two solar and two this year.

Explore further: Second total lunar eclipse of year coming up Wed.

More information: NASA: eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/OH/OH2014.html#SE2014Oct23P

Related Stories

Partial solar eclipse over the U.S. on Thursday, Oct. 23

October 17, 2014

People in most of the continental United States will be in the shadow of the Moon on Thursday afternoon, Oct. 23, as a partial solar eclipse sweeps across the Earth. For people looking through sun-safe filters, from Los Angeles, ...

How to safely enjoy the October 23 partial solar eclipse

October 21, 2014

2014 – a year rich in eclipses. The Moon dutifully slid into Earth's shadow in April and October gifting us with two total lunars. Now it's the Sun's turn. This Thursday October 23 skywatchers across much of the North America ...

Partial solar eclipse at sunset around Australia

April 28, 2014

There will be a partial solar eclipse visible around sunset in Australia Tuesday 29 April. As much as two-thirds of the Sun will be blocked by the Moon dependent on location as northern parts of Australia will see less of ...

Recommended for you

Fast radio bursts may be firing off every second

September 21, 2017

When fast radio bursts, or FRBs, were first detected in 2001, astronomers had never seen anything like them before. Since then, astronomers have found a couple of dozen FRBs, but they still don't know what causes these rapid ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.