Image: Orion's first crew module complete

September 9, 2014, NASA
Credit: NASA/Rad Sinyak

NASA's first completed Orion crew module sits atop its service module at the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Facility at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The crew and service module will be transferred together on Wednesday to another facility for fueling, before moving again for the installation of the launch abort system.

At that point, the spacecraft will be complete and ready to stack on top of the Delta IV Heavy rocket that will carry it into space on its first flight in December.

For that flight, Exploration Flight Test-1, Orion will travel 3,600 miles above the Earth – farther than any spacecraft built to carry people has traveled in more than 40 years – and return home at speeds of 20,000 miles per hour, while enduring temperatures near 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit. 

Explore further: Image: Orion crew module at the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building, Kennedy Space Center

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6 comments

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eltodesukane
1 / 5 (2) Sep 09, 2014
US has no plan (and no justification) to send human into space, yet they are building the Orion crew module. What a waste.
dramamoose
5 / 5 (4) Sep 09, 2014
I mean..they have a long-term plan; they definitely want to go to Mars at some point, and may do an asteroid and a return to the Moon before going to the red planet.

They need a crew module in order to do that. Much easier to have the capsule ready now for when SLS is ready than to have to develop it later. It's far far far less of a waste than say, most military expenses.

Justification? It's there, we are going to go someday. Why not now?
Uncle Ira
3 / 5 (2) Sep 09, 2014
I think I'm reading it right but maybe not. This one won't have astronaut-Skippys in him in December right? It's only for the testing and seeing if everything is working like it is supposed to right?

So when it says that this is the "first completed crew module" does that mean it is just like the ones that the astronaut-Skippys will fly on? Will they be able to use this one again later to fly on?
Uncle Ira
3 / 5 (2) Sep 09, 2014
I think I'm reading it right but maybe not. This one won't have astronaut-Skippys in him in December right? It's only for the testing and seeing if everything is working like it is supposed to right?

So when it says that this is the "first completed crew module" does that mean it is just like the ones that the astronaut-Skippys will fly on? Will they be able to use this one again later to fly on?


@ Everybody.

Just reporting that I found the answer on the google places. I was reading it right, the astronaut-Skippys are not going to fly in this one. Not this time and not the another time no. When this one gets back, they are going to take him all apart and look at every little piece and part to see how he did and if there is anything to worry about or need to change.
Uncle Ira
3 / 5 (2) Sep 09, 2014
P.S. For Everybody. The NASA has a really good place with lots of stuffs about this Orion thing. I can't put the linkum in but you can find it like I did, just tell the google you want NASA Orion.
Whydening Gyre
5 / 5 (2) Sep 09, 2014
I think I'm reading it right but maybe not. This one won't have astronaut-Skippys in him in December right? It's only for the testing and seeing if everything is working like it is supposed to right?

So when it says that this is the "first completed crew module" does that mean it is just like the ones that the astronaut-Skippys will fly on? Will they be able to use this one again later to fly on?

Yes. And yes. But they won't. Need to look at all the parts to see how they worked together....

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