Feds: Small Ore., Calif. fish no longer endangered

February 12, 2014 by Jeff Barnard

Federal biologists say a small fish in desert creeks of Southern Oregon and Northern California has recovered enough to get off the endangered species list.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Wednesday the Modoc sucker is no longer in danger of extinction, after nearly 30 years of recovery efforts.

The Modoc sucker is the second fish in two weeks proposed for delisting. It was listed in 1985 due to loss of habitat. Recovery efforts have focused on fencing livestock out of its streams.

The proposal goes through a 60-day public comment period before a final decision.

The action comes as Republicans in Congress are trying to change the Endangered Species Act to limit lawsuits and give states more power.

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