Image: A portrait of global winds

A Portrait of Global Winds
Credit: William Putman/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

High-resolution global atmospheric modeling provides a unique tool to study the role of weather within Earth's climate system. NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System Model (GEOS-5) is capable of simulating worldwide weather at resolutions as fine as 3.5 kilometers.

This visualization shows global winds from a GEOS-5 simulation using 10-kilometer resolution. Surface winds (0 to 40 meters/second) are shown in white and trace features including Atlantic and Pacific cyclones. Upper-level winds (250 hectopascals) are colored by speed (0 to 175 meters/second), with red indicating faster.

This simulation ran on the Discover supercomputer at the NASA Center for Climate Simulation. The complete 2-year "Nature Run" simulation—a computer model representation of Earth's atmosphere from basic inputs including observed sea-surface temperatures and surface emissions from biomass burning, volcanoes and anthropogenic sources—produces its own unique weather patterns including precipitation, aerosols and hurricanes. A follow-on Nature Run is simulating Earth's atmosphere at 7 kilometers for 2 years and 3.5 kilometers for 3 months.


Explore further

Researchers improve simulations of deep moist convection to accurately predict effects of climate change

Provided by NASA
Citation: Image: A portrait of global winds (2013, November 22) retrieved 25 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-11-image-portrait-global.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
0 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more