What the Earth and Moon look like from Saturn

What the Earth and Moon look like from Saturn
Earth and Moon imaged from Cassini on July 19, 2013

Did you smile and wave at Saturn on Friday? If you did (and even if you didn't) here's how you—and everyone else on Earth—looked to the Cassini spacecraft, 898.4 million miles away.

Hope you didn't blink!

The image above is a color-composite made from raw images acquired by Cassini in red, green, and blue visible light wavelengths. Some of the specks around the edges are background stars, and others are the result of high-energy particle noise, of which some have been digitally removed.

The Moon is the bright dot just below and to the left of Earth. (An original raw image can be seen here.)

Cassini acquired the images while capturing views of Saturn in eclipse against the Sun between 22:24:00 UTC on July 19 and 02:43:00 UTC on July 20 (6:24 to 10:43 pm EDT July 19.) On Cassini time, the Earth imaging took place between 22:47:13 UTC (6:47:13 pm EDT) and 23:01:56 UTC (7:01:56 pm EDT) on the 19th.

Provided by Universe Today

Citation: What the Earth and Moon look like from Saturn (2013, July 22) retrieved 2 February 2023 from https://phys.org/news/2013-07-earth-moon-saturn.html
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