Nebula One steps forth as world's first cloud computer

April 3, 2013 by Nancy Owano report

(Phys.org) —Nebula has announced its first product, Nebula One. The new entry is defined in a promotional video (with symphonic, celestial music and a British voiceover for gravitas) as the world's first cloud computer. The product combines a hardware controller integrated with software for an all in one storage, compute, and networked services system. To hear Nebula's team describe it, the Nebula One is a product that can reinvent cloud computing.

The controller itself is on sale now, at a starting price of $100,000, which may run higher, depending on the customer's needs and configurations.

The new One system must be coupled with certified industry-standard x86 servers. Customers can choose on their own which vendor's certified servers, such as from Dell, or HP, that they want to include as part of the system. The Nebula One controller can do all the pooling of resources from up to 20 server nodes, so that it can deliver its business customer a unified .

Nebula One's software could configure extra servers if and when they are added. A single-rack deployment is enough for most medium-sized businesses, but the Nebula One system can scale to multi-rack deployments for large enterprises.

Chris Kemp, co-founder and CEO of Nebula, who had served in CTO and CIO posts at , along with his team, worked on their product with the intent of providing a solution that can allow a business to go "self-service" in operating a private cloud infrastructure.

The Nebula One solution runs Cosmos, Nebula's distributed enterprise cloud operating system. which builds on OpenStack, according to the company's press release, providing compatibility with Amazon Web Services and OpenStack APIs.

(OpenStack, founded by Rackspace Hosting and NASA, is defined as a cloud operating system that controls large pools of compute, storage, and networking resources throughout a , managed through a dashboard, that gives administrators control while empowering users to provision resources through a web interface. Its code is under the Apache license.)

The fundamental selling point of Nebula One is that it will make private clouds easier to operate. The goal underlying development of the new product has been to make a private cloud system something that the business user can plug in and turn on, achieving, at log-in, an availability of computing resources on demand. "Previous cloud solutions often required users to put in hours of work to provision and maintain their computing environment. The Nebula One private cloud system frees the organization to focus on applications instead of infrastructure," according to Nebula's team.

Explore further: NASA's Nebula Cloud Computing Technology To Play Key Role In New Open Source Initiative

More information: Site: www.nebula.com/
Nebula One: www.nebula.com/nebula-one
Press release: nebula-static.s3.amazonaws.com … ch_press_release.pdf

Related Stories

Hubble images searchlight beams from a preplanetary nebula

April 28, 2012

(Phys.org) -- The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has been at the cutting edge of research into what happens to stars like our sun at the ends of their lives. One stage that stars pass through as they run out of nuclear fuel ...

The smoky pink core of the Omega Nebula

January 4, 2012

(PhysOrg.com) -- A new image of the Omega Nebula, captured by ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), is one of the sharpest of this object ever taken from the ground. It shows the dusty, rose-coloured central parts of this famous ...

Image: Decorating the sky

December 27, 2010

This mosaic image taken by NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, features three nebulae that are part of the giant Orion Molecular Cloud--the Flame nebula, the Horsehead nebula and NGC 2023.

Image: Hubble's lagoon

October 15, 2010

Like brush strokes on a canvas, ridges of color seem to flow across the Lagoon Nebula, a canvas nearly 3 light-years wide.

Astrophoto: Beautiful new look at the Orion Nebula

March 28, 2013

The enormous cloud of dust and gas that makes up the Orion Nebula is featured in this beautiful astrophoto. This image was a joint effort, with images taken by Gary Gonnella – a regular on our Virtual Star Parties – and ...

Recommended for you

A not-quite-random walk demystifies the algorithm

December 15, 2017

The algorithm is having a cultural moment. Originally a math and computer science term, algorithms are now used to account for everything from military drone strikes and financial market forecasts to Google search results.

US faces moment of truth on 'net neutrality'

December 14, 2017

The acrimonious battle over "net neutrality" in America comes to a head Thursday with a US agency set to vote to roll back rules enacted two years earlier aimed at preventing a "two-speed" internet.

FCC votes along party lines to end 'net neutrality' (Update)

December 14, 2017

The Federal Communications Commission repealed the Obama-era "net neutrality" rules Thursday, giving internet service providers like Verizon, Comcast and AT&T a free hand to slow or block websites and apps as they see fit ...

The wet road to fast and stable batteries

December 14, 2017

An international team of scientists—including several researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory—has discovered an anode battery material with superfast charging and stable operation ...

2 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Sonhouse
1.5 / 5 (2) Apr 03, 2013
So how much bang for the buck? How many gigabytes/second and memory and so forth?
Phil DePayne
1 / 5 (3) Apr 03, 2013
I hope they have good tech support for their proprietary system, I would hate to be on the phone with some jerk while half of my servers are blinking their LEDs

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.