Cut in Russian link to space station not serious: NASA

Employees watch the final preflight practical examination of the next expedition to the ISS in September 2012
Employees of the Cosmonaut Training Centre watch the final preflight practical examination of the next expedition to the International Space Station, at in Star City, outside Moscow in September 2012. NASA minimized the impact of a cut in Russia's communications link with the International Space Station on Wednesday and said the problem would likely be fixed within the hour.

NASA minimized the impact of a cut in Russia's communications link with the International Space Station on Wednesday and said the problem would likely be fixed within the hour.

"It is a cut communications cable outside of the mission control center in Moscow. That happened before. It happens from time to time," said spokesman Josh Byerly.

"They still have the ability to communicate with the Russian segment (of the ISS) through us. It is what they always do anyway," he said. "So it's not the first time and there is usually no impact and they will be correcting it in the next hour."

Officials at the Roscosmos , cited by Russian news agencies, said Russia had lost contact with its satellites and could not send commands to the ISS because of the severed cable.

"Our specialists lack the ability to control the civilian satellites or send commands to the Russian segment of the ISS," a source told RIA Novosti, adding that the problem could take two days to fix.


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Citation: Cut in Russian link to space station not serious: NASA (2012, November 14) retrieved 19 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-11-russian-link-space-station-nasa.html
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