Sharp begins production of 5-inch full-HD LCD panels

Sharp Corporation has started production of 5-inch full-HD (1,080 x 1,920 pixels, 443 ppi) LCD panels for smartphones with a pixel density among the highest in the world. Production began at the end of September and full-scale production will begin in October.

This LCD panel employs CG-, a new pixel design, and an process to achieve the same number of pixels in a smartphone-size screen as there are in a full-HD LCD TV. The panel, which has approximately 1.3 times the pixel density of conventional LCD panels, can display crisp text, super-clear maps, and amazingly real HD images.

By providing ultra-detailed LCD panels to support the growing worldwide demand for smartphones, Sharp will contribute to smartphones with increasingly higher quality images.


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Source: Sharp
Citation: Sharp begins production of 5-inch full-HD LCD panels (2012, October 1) retrieved 25 April 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-10-sharp-production-inch-full-hd-lcd.html
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Oct 05, 2012
The moment one of these makes it into a Nexus phone, I'm buying it. My HTC Incredible doesn't run the latest CyanogenMod, so, I'm getting ready to spring for a replacement.

Oct 05, 2012
Seriously? 5 inches? I still can't understand why people actually feel comfortable lugging those kinds of bricks around.

If you need an extra bag to lug your electronics along with you then you're doing something wrong.

Oct 06, 2012
Because it's a psuedo-computer / media device, not just a phone. I don't think 5" is excessive to carry around constantly, given all the things that a smart "phone" can do.

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