Skydiver's supersonic plunge stalled by rough test

August 16, 2012 by MARCIA DUNN

Skydiver Felix Baumgartner will have to wait until fall before attempting a supersonic jump from 23 miles (37 kilometers) above the Earth.

The Austrian was ready to take the plunge high above the desert at the end of this month. But on a test in late July, the capsule that hoisted him to an of more than 18 miles (29 kilometers) was damaged. The space-like capsule landed on a rocky, uneven surface and fell over.

Organizers this week said the craft needs to be rebuilt and tested before Baumgartner attempts his grand finale.

Baumgartner hopes everything will be ready by early to mid-October. He aims to break the sound barrier by jumping from 125,000 feet (38,100 meters). The current record is 102,800 feet (31,333 meters).

Explore further: Skydiver Fearless Felix jumps from 18 miles up

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