Stolen New Mexico meteorite worth $20K-$40K found

January 10, 2012

(AP) -- A meteorite that landed in Russia in the 1940s and was recently stolen from the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque has been located.

KRQE-TV reports authorities found the rock after a man in Missouri bought it for $1,700. It's worth between $20,000 to $40,000.

The Meteorite Museum at UNM flew an employee to retrieve the nearly 21-pound chunk of space - and lug it through security.

School police believe someone stole the meteorite from the display case and walked out the front door. Investigators have a suspect but no one has been arrested.

The meteorite was once part of the between Mars and and crashed in . It was a gift from a Soviet scientist.

The Meteorite Museum is closed for a security review.

Explore further: Smithsonian keeps meteorite that fell in Va.

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