New strawberry a delight for gardeners

July 1, 2011
The new Roseberry strawberry features sweet, aromatic fruit and attractive flowers. Credit: Photo courtesy of Shahrokh Khanizadeh

A new, versatile strawberry has been introduced for home gardeners. 'Roseberry' is predicted to be very popular as an ornamental addition to gardens. The strawberry features attractive pink blooms and produces sweet, aromatic fruit all summer long. Because it produces flowers and fruits on stolons before they root, 'Roseberry' works equally well in hanging baskets and when planted as groundcover. 'Roseberry' premiered in HortScience.

According to scientist Shahrokh Khanizadeh, corresponding author of the report, 'Roseberry' (Fragaria xananassa Duch.) plants are winter hardy; the plants survived winters during the experiment with no damage when protected by 10 cm of straw cover. "The plants are also vigorous with a spreading . They produce multiple crowns and few (three) stolons in the first year of growth, but a medium (five) number of stolons are produced in the second and subsequent years", Khanizadeh added.

'Roseberry' flowers appear in early July during the first year of growth and by mid-May to early June the next and subsequent years. The plants flower continuously during the summer; flowers last until the first frosts. The fruits of 'Roseberry' are dark red and moderately glossy. "The fruit is a bit soft like 'Rosalyne' but has an excellent, very aromatic flavor with medium sugar and acidity", said Khanizadeh.

The researchers recommend 'Roseberry' as an outstanding addition to home gardens because of the variety's summer-long show of flowers and "very tasty fruit". 'Roseberry' is especially beautiful in hanging baskets because the stolons flower and fruit before rooting and do not break as ripen.

Explore further: AgriLife Research scientists trumpeting possible new adaptation of tropical flower

More information: hortsci.ashspublications.org/cgi/content/full/45/10/1545

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2 comments

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Cave_Man
not rated yet Jul 01, 2011
Why no mention of the genetic source of such wonderful berry plants?
MadLintElf
not rated yet Jul 01, 2011
CM-believe they are hybrids, not gen enged..
Cheers
http://www.learn2...et-ppaf/

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