Intel updates Atom processor roadmap

Intel Atom processors

(PhysOrg.com) -- Intel is one the biggest names in PC processors, if not the single biggest, but as is the way with all markets as new things come in the landscape can change in the blink of an eye. When the hardware inside mobile devices started to become a serious chunk of the processor market, the ARM chips have became the big name in that area. Like any good company with a strong position in the market Intel is looking to keep their number one spot and move into the mobile market in a big way.

So, it can be no surprise that, rather than creating a line of processor specifically for smart phone and tablet PCs, the company has chosen to work with an existing line of processors. The Atom processor line, a well-established line of processors for laptops and desktops, is getting some new members to the family tree. The line of processors are expected to change and grow over the next three years. There will be three new chips in the Atom family, one in 2012, one in 2013 and one in 2014.

The chips are also going to show some significant changes with each generation released. The current generation of Atom processors has a 45nm technology node. Next years processors will be 32nm node, which are correctly sized to fit into a mobile phone or a easily. In the following years we will see these chip numbers decrease, the chip that are slated to come out in 2013 are expected to have a 22nm technology node. That chip will be named the 'Silvermount'. It will reduce the power usage from the current 40W to just only the use of 15W. The 'Airmont', 14nm Atom processor, is expected to be rolled out in 2014.

So, you may soon see the trademarked "Intel Inside" on your next cell phone.


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Citation: Intel updates Atom processor roadmap (2011, May 18) retrieved 23 October 2020 from https://phys.org/news/2011-05-intel-atom-processor-roadmap.html
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