Single-particle resonances in a deformed relativistic potential

June 3, 2010

A variety of structural phenomena in exotic short-lived nuclei far from stability, especially in systems close to the particle drip lines, challenge model descriptions based on the self-consistent mean-field approximation. Because the Fermi level in a drip-line nucleus is very close to the continuum, both weakly-bound states and low-lying positive energy single-particle resonant states are essential to determine the ground state properties of such systems.

The research team at Peking University, which has been dedicated to the study of nuclear structure and for the last few decades, has examined the evolution of levels close to the continuum threshold and, in particular, the occurrence of single-neutron resonant states as functions of the axial deformation parameter 0 ≤ β ≤ 0.5. The study is reported in Issue 53, Volume 4 (April, 2010) of Science China Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy.

For an open-shell close to the drip-line, interesting effects result from the interplay between deformation and low-lying resonances, and therefore the theoretical investigation of single-particle resonant states in deformed potentials is particularly interesting. In the paper by Li et al., the single-neutron states with positive parity have been obtained as solutions of the corresponding single-particle Dirac equation, using the coupled-channels method in coordinate space.

The main conclusion reported by the investigators is that the admixture of s1/2 component determines the occurrence of single-neutron resonant states as functions of the axial deformation parameter.

"In our current work, the main focus is on single-particle resonances in a deformed system, especially those with mπ=1/2+. This is also the foundation for the understanding of a deformed exotic nucleus in Relativistic Mean-Field (RMF) theory and a natural extension of our previous work on spherical cases" noted principal investigator MENG Jie, Professor at Peking University.

Funding from the Major State Basic Research Developing Program, the National Natural Science Foundation in China, and Inter-governmental S&T Cooperation Project between China and Croatia supported this research.

It is considered that this research deserves publication because the approach is state-of-art, the work is innovative, the results are of interest, and the paper is well written.

Explore further: For the First Time, Scientists Measure the Size of a One-Neutron Halo with Lasers

More information: Li Z P, Zhang Y, Vretenar D, Meng J. Single-particle resonances in a deformed relativistic potential. Science China Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy, 2010, 53(4): 773-778 scichina.com:8083/sciGe/EN/abstract/abstract417025.shtml#

Related Stories

Quantum simulation of a relativistic particle

January 6, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Researchers of the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information (IQOQI) in Innsbruck, Austria used a calcium ion to simulate a relativistic quantum particle, demonstrating a phenomenon that has not ...

Exotic symmetry seen in ultracold electrons

January 18, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- An exotic type of symmetry - suggested by string theory and theories of high-energy particle physics, and also conjectured for electrons in solids under certain conditions - has been observed experimentally ...

Physicists pin down the proton-halo state in Flourine-17

May 26, 2010

A halo nucleus has one or more nucleons that are only weakly bound to the nuclear core. Consequently, they drift far away from it, forming, in effect, a halo. These nuclei are difficult to study because their lives are both ...

Neutron physics instrument may unlock mysteries of universe

September 16, 2004

Fundamental questions that particle physicists have pondered for decades might be answered when a $9.2 million neutron physics beam line is built at the Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source on Chestnut Ridge. ...

Recommended for you

Researchers control soft robots using magnetic fields

March 29, 2017

A team of engineering researchers has made a fundamental advance in controlling so-called soft robots, using magnetic fields to remotely manipulate microparticle chains embedded in soft robotic devices. The researchers have ...

How to outwit noise in quantum communication

March 29, 2017

How to reliably transfer quantum information when the connecting channels are impacted by detrimental noise? Scientists at the University of Innsbruck and TU Wien (Vienna) have presented new solutions to this problem.

Testing the performance of semiconductors—with light

March 29, 2017

Semiconductors are the cornerstone of modern electronics. They're used in solar cells, light emitting diodes (LEDs), microprocessors in laptops and cell phones, and more. Most of them are made of silicon, but silicon has ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.