'Extinct' Aussie frog rediscovered

Yellow-Spotted Bell Frog, presumed to be extinct, has been rediscovered in a remote Australian creek
A view of the Blue Mountains National Park, inland from central Sydney, is pictured in this file photo. An Australian frog which disappeared nearly 40 years ago and was feared extinct has been rediscovered in a remote creek, astounding experts. The frogs' location will be kept secret to ensure their survival, while talks are underway about setting up a captive breeding programme.

An Australian frog which disappeared nearly 40 years ago and was feared extinct has been rediscovered in a remote creek, astounding experts.

A state government scientist spotted an unusual species during a trip to New South Wales' Southern Tablelands, and later returned with a specialist to confirm the Yellow-Spotted Bell Frog's first sighting since 1973.

"This was definitely the most exciting moment of my career and I will be surprised if I repeat it," doctor David Hunter, who was led to a thriving community of the frogs by conservation officer Luke Pearce, said Thursday.

State environment minister Frank Sartor said the re-emergence of the green and gold showed the importance of protecting natural habitats.

"I'm advised that finding this frog is as significant a discovery as a Tasmanian tiger," he said, referring to an animal which is believed to have died out last century.

The frogs' location will be kept secret to ensure their survival, while the state government is in talks with Sydney's Taronga Zoo about setting up a programme.


Explore further

Biologists rediscover endangered frog population

(c) 2010 AFP

Citation: 'Extinct' Aussie frog rediscovered (2010, March 4) retrieved 11 December 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-03-extinct-aussie-frog-rediscovered.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
0 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments