AMD Planning 16-Core Server Chip For 2011 Release

AMD Opteron 64

(PhysOrg.com) -- AMD is in the process of designing a server chip with up to 16-cores. Code named Interlagos, the server chip will contain between 12 and 16 cores and will be available in 2011.

Pat Patia, VP of AMD's server platform unit stated that increasing chip core counts will improve performance and reduce by the processors. The increase of server chip cores can reduce the total power consumption and server count in a data center.

The 16-core chips can be deployed in with two to four chip sockets thereby maximizing each server with up to 64 cores. The chip will be part of AMD's Opteron 6000 series chips.

AMD's Opteron chips compete with Intel's 8-core version of its Xeon server chips, code named Nehalem-EX, which is due for release in 2010.

AMD's future chips will integrate advanced power management features and improved instruction sets for better task executions in virtualized environments. By manually capping the power drawn by cores, users will be able to better control power consumption.

Along with AMD's new server chips, there are plans to add additional memory and cache support in the server platforms. One feature that would be lacking in these new chips is multithreading which allows cores to execute multiple threads and task simultaneously; this feature however is currently used in Intel's chips.

The new chips, made by , will be made using the 32-nanometer which is more energy efficient and has better performance than the current 45-nanometer process.

AMD's goal is to add more complex features onto the surface of a processor so that it can handle a larger number of applications.

© 2009 PhysOrg.com


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Citation: AMD Planning 16-Core Server Chip For 2011 Release (2009, April 27) retrieved 14 July 2020 from https://phys.org/news/2009-04-amd-core-server-chip.html
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