Canadian greenhouse gases rose 1990-2005

April 22, 2008

Canada's greenhouse gas emissions increased 25 percent between 1990 and 2005, a federal report published Tuesday said.

The Statistics Canada report, timed for release on Earth Day, said in 2005, human activities released the equivalent of 747 million tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, up 25 percent from emissions of 596 million tons in 1990.

Energy production and consumption accounted for more than 80 percent of emissions in 2005, the report said.

StatsCan said the increase in emissions would have been even greater had it not been for increases in energy efficiency.

While Canada has about 0.5 percent of the world's population, it contributes about 2 percent of the total global greenhouse emissions, the report said.

In 2005, just more than 23 tons of gases were emitted for each person in Canada, which is an 8 percent per capita increase since 1990, compared with 24.4 tons per capita in the United States.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: How the U.S. might fulfill its Paris pledge without the White House

Related Stories

Scientists say cost of capturing CO2 declining

October 9, 2017

Technology now in limited use removes about 90 percent of carbon dioxide from the smokestacks of coal-fired power plants, but energy experts say cost remains the chief obstacle to bringing the "clean coal" touted by President ...

America's place in the sun: Energy report sets goal

December 24, 2014

A recent energy report said that America should build on the recent growth in solar energy by setting a goal of obtaining at least 10 percent of its electricity from solar power by 2030. "Star Power: The Growing Role of Solar ...

Recommended for you

'Smoke rings' in the ocean spotted from space

December 11, 2017

Researchers from the University of Liverpool have spotted the equivalent of smoke-rings in the ocean which they think could 'suck-up' small marine creatures and carry them at high speed and for long distances across the ocean.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.