U.S., S. Koreans team for research

November 23, 2007

A nanotechnology study will span the United States and the Pacific Ocean as University of Delaware professors team with South Korean counterparts.

The research was made possible through a $5 million grant from the Korea Ministry of Science and Technology, the University of Delaware said in a news release. Tsu-Wei Chou, Pierre S. du Pont Chair of Engineering, and Erik Thostenson, assistant professor of mechanical engineering, will lead the UD effort in the nine-year program.

The funding comes through the ministry's Global Research Laboratory program, which seeks to develop fundamental and original technologies through international collaborative research between Korean and foreign laboratories. In addition to nanotechnology, GRL program supports collaborative research in biotechnology and information technology.

"The program, which will establish a global collaborative network between KIMS and UD-CCM, will enable us to advance the research in hybrid micro- and nano-composites for structural and functional applications," Chou said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: A surprise new butterflyfish is described from the Philippine 'twilight zone' and exhibit

Related Stories

Exascale and the city

October 17, 2017

Walk around any city neighborhood and chances are it looks nothing like it did 20 years ago. Thanks to growing urbanization, cities globally are rapidly expanding and accounting for more of our world's population, gross domestic ...

Researchers develop earthquake-resistant concrete

October 12, 2017

A new seismic-resistant, fibre-reinforced concrete developed at the University of British Columbia will see its first real-life application this fall as part of the seismic retrofit of a Vancouver elementary school.

Recommended for you

Breakthrough in ultra-fast data processing at nanoscale

October 20, 2017

A research team from the National University of Singapore has recently invented a novel "converter" that can harness the speed and small size of plasmons for high frequency data processing and transmission in nanoelectronics.

Art advancing science at the nanoscale

October 18, 2017

Like many other scientists, Don Ingber, M.D., Ph.D., the Founding Director of the Wyss Institute, is concerned that non-scientists have become skeptical and even fearful of his field at a time when technology can offer solutions ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.