EPA says sulfur dioxide emissions are down

November 17, 2007

U.S. officials say efforts to decrease sulfur dioxide emissions from power companies have resulted in a 40 percent reduction since 1990.

The Environmental Protection Agency said reductions in sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide emissions have led to a significant decrease in acid deposition, resulting in improved water quality in U.S. lakes and streams.

The EPA's Acid Rain and Related Programs Progress Report said sulfur dioxide emissions last year were down 830,000 tons from 2005, while nitrogen dioxide emissions have decreased by 3 million tons since 1990.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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