Chinese takeaway in the Wadden Sea

September 25, 2007

Shore crabs catch their food at food-rich spots and subsequently eat it elsewhere. With this takeaway strategy the crabs maximize their food uptake and keep competing crabs at a distance, says Dutch researcher Isabel Smallegange.

Food is not available everywhere in the Wadden Sea so you have to search for it. Yet if you do not have much time then where is the best place to go? Initially the food rich spots always seem to be the first choice. But there you can find other animals of course and that gives rise to food competition. With plenty of competitors there is little time left to consume the prey caught.

Experiments revealed that shore crabs always first attempt to catch their prey at the richest food spot. However, the shore crabs do not consume their prey there. Instead, they take these with them to a nearby food poor spot where there are fewer competitors who want to share the meal.

With this takeaway meal strategy shore crabs are ensured of their dinner and they avoid greedy comrades. Field observations in the Wadden Sea suggest that shore crabs take both factors into account in their final choice of food spot when the alternatives are far away from each other.

The research into strategies in food searches was done using behavioural models and behavioural experiments with food searching shore crabs in experimental set ups in climate chambers at the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ).

Source: Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research

Explore further: Environmental scientist takes high tech to salt marshes

Related Stories

'Shell-shocked' crabs can feel pain

January 16, 2013

The latest study by Professor Bob Elwood and Barry Magee from Queen's School of Biological Sciences looked at the reactions of common shore crabs to small electrical shocks, and their behaviour after experiencing those shocks. ...

Recommended for you

Why communication is vital—even among plants and funghi

May 26, 2017

Plant scientists at the University of Cambridge have found a plant protein indispensable for communication early in the formation of symbiosis - the mutually beneficial relationship between plants and fungi. Symbiosis significantly ...

Darwin was right: Females prefer sex with good listeners

May 26, 2017

Almost 150 years after Charles Darwin first proposed a little-known prediction from his theory of sexual selection, researchers have found that male moths with larger antennae are better at detecting female signals.

SDO sees partial eclipse in space

May 26, 2017

On May 25, 2017, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, saw a partial solar eclipse in space when it caught the moon passing in front of the sun. The lunar transit lasted almost an hour, between 2:24 and 3:17 p.m. EDT, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.