Climate change leads to lawsuits

May 26, 2007

A new book says concern about global warming is causing U.S. corporations and law practices to taken on more litigation.

While Congress has not adopted any laws that explicitly require the control of greenhouse gases, lawsuits have been brought all over the country concerning the applicability of the Clean Air Act, the National Environmental Policy Act and other statutes, the American Bar Association said Friday in a release.

The ABA said the widespread assumption that mandatory federal regulation is inevitable is already affecting many corporate practices.

The ABA's new book, "Global Climate Change and U.S. Law," is an account of federal, state and local laws and litigation that are rapidly developing around climate change.

The association said "the book addresses the international and national frameworks of climate change law, including clean air regulation, civil remedies and the impact of the Kyoto Protocol on many domestic actions."

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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