Tsunami not yet detected: expert

April 2, 2007

Although the Bureau of Metereology had issued a tsunami warning, at this stage a tsunami had not yet been detected, a University of Queensland geophysicist said this morning.

“This is the first such warning issued from the Tsunami Warning System, following a a large magnitude earthquake which the Bureau of Meterology estimates was a magnitude 8.1,” Dr Dion Weatherley said.

“This is 30 times smaller than the Sumatra earthquake which generated the Boxing Day, 2004 tsunami.

“At this stage a tsunami has not yet been detected but we should know in the next hour or so from tide gauges. We should know by 10am.

“An earthquake of this size is capable of generating a tsunami of up to two metres, or not generating a tsunami at all.

“There is no cause for immediate alarm.”

Dr Weatherley is a research fellow in UQ's Earth Systems Science Computational Centre (ESSCC).

Source: University of Queensland

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