Ancient British artifacts to be displayed

November 30, 2006

An ancient curse inscribed on a sheet of lead is one of several treasures going on display from a British archaeological dig.

About 60 archaeologists from the University of Leicester have been working for three years in the city of Leicester, producing new insights into the development of Roman and other medieval towns.

One of the most interesting finds is a "curse tablet" -- a sheet of lead inscribed during the second or third century A.D. and intended to invoke the assistance of a chosen god in delivering punishment on a suspected thief.

"The recent excavations have been on a scale rarely seen in British cities, and for the first time in Leicester it has been possible to look at large areas of the Roman and medieval town," said Richard Buckley, co-director of the University of Leicester Archaeological Services. "This has made it possible to examine complete buildings and to see how an entire neighborhood changed over almost 2000 years."

Many of the artifacts will be publicly displayed for the first time Saturday at Leicester's Jewry Wall Museum.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Rare discovery of Late Roman official buried in Leicester

Related Stories

Rare discovery of Late Roman official buried in Leicester

July 12, 2016

Archaeologists from University of Leicester Archaeological Services (ULAS) have recently excavated a Late Roman cemetery at Western Road in Leicester's West End. Amongst the 83 skeletons recorded by the team, one burial is ...

Recommended for you

New paper answers causation conundrum

November 17, 2017

In a new paper published in a special issue of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A, SFI Professor Jessica Flack offers a practical answer to one of the most significant, and most confused questions in evolutionary ...

Chance discovery of forgotten 1960s 'preprint' experiment

November 16, 2017

For years, scientists have complained that it can take months or even years for a scientific discovery to be published, because of the slowness of peer review. To cut through this problem, researchers in physics and mathematics ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.