Ruling allows poultry pollution evidence

March 24, 2006

A judge in Oklahoma has ruled that state officials may collect evidence for a lawsuit in which they allege poultry farms are polluting state watersheds.

Magistrate Sam Joyner in U.S. District Court ruled state officials have the right to collect evidence of soil, water and waste from 14 poultry companies, The Oklahoman, an Oklahoma City newspaper, reported Friday.

Scott McDaniel, a Peterson Farms Inc. attorney, said the ruling proves the state attorney general does not have the evidence showing farmers are polluting water. He also said the ruling allows farmers to individually protest to the court to not allow soil sample collections on their land.

However, Oklahoma Attorney General Drew Edmondson called the ruling a victory for the environment.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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