Poll: Public clueless about IPTV

March 21, 2006

Internet protocol TV has a significant potential market in several Western countries, despite a recent poll showing many people have no idea what it is. The prediction and the poll both come from Accenture, an international management consulting, technology service and outsourcing company.

The survey found that of 6,000 residents of the United States, England, France, Germany, Spain and Italy, 46 percent of the respondents didn't know what IPTV was, according to an Accenture company statement.

IPTV technology allows high-quality, digital TV to be broadcast over the Internet infrastructure, the statement said.

In addition to quizzing people's technological savvy, Accenture also tested the waters for a potential IPTV market, and according to the company statement, several of the answers point to good market potential.

For instance, when asked how they would improve their television viewing experience, 30 percent said they were interested in seeing more movies, and 26 percent responded that they wanted to choose what they watched, and when, as customers of TiVo can.

When asked which of IPTV's features could convince them to make the switch, 55 percent named IPTV's fewer commercials while 47 percent cited the ability to watch programs on demand, the statement said.

However, 54 percent of the respondents also said they weren't willing to pay extra fees for the IPTV services, the statement said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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