Survey: Higher prices cool Internet dating

February 9, 2006

A new survey finds that higher prices for Internet dating sites have apparently cooled off public enthusiasm for meeting people online.

Jupiter Research released a pre-Valentine's Day report on pricing strategies for online dating services that shows 5 percent of Internet users paid for online dating subscriptions last year, down from 6 percent in 2004.

Although industry revenues grew during the same period, Jupiter found that more than one-third of users who tried out a service did not convert to a full paid subscription.

"Thirty seven percent of visitors who don't convert say dating sites cost too much, making it their leading complaint," said Jupiter analyst Nate Elliott.

Notably, the survey determined that most users who declined to subscribe did not then attempt to use free socializing sites to meet people, eliminating the cheapskate factor.

Elliott said the findings indicated that offering targeted subscription discounts would be the best way for dating sites to pump up their subscription bases.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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