AAAS denounces bills undermining evolution

February 20, 2006

The American Association for the Advancement of Science, meeting in St. Louis, said Sunday it strongly denounced legislation undermining evolution.

The board of directors of the world's largest general scientific organization said that polices and legislation to undermine the teaching of evolution would "deprive students of the education they need to be informed and productive citizens in an increasingly technological, global community."

Currently, at least 14 laws concerning evolution education are pending in state legislatures.

They differ in language and strategy, but "all would weaken science education," said AAAS President Gilbert S. Omenn, of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. "The AAAS board of directors opposes these attacks on the integrity of science and science education."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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