Bell Labs wins technical Grammy award

January 10, 2006

Bell Labs won Tuesday the technical Grammy award by the Recording Academy that is awarded for technical contributions to the recording field.

The group, which is the research arm of Lucent Technologies, said that this was the first technical Grammy ever awarded to a communications research laboratory.

"Bell Labs continues to be laser-focused on communication innovations, the fruits of which continue to enrich our everyday lives by providing continual improvements for how we create, capture, and enjoy digital entertainment such as music," said Sid Ahuja, vice president of software media research whose center oversees current multimedia, digital entertainment, acoustics, and speech research efforts in a news release.

The technical Grammy will be awarded Feb. 7, while the 48th annual Grammy awards will take place Feb. 8.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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