Study: Truckers' risk higher in 11th hour

Penn State scientists say crash risks for truck drivers during the last hour of a now legal 11-hour day are more than three times that of the first hour.

For 60 years, federal rules limited truckers to 10 consecutive hours of driving. However, in January 2004, that was raised to 11 hours.

But Penn State Professor Paul Jovanis, who led the study, said: "Our analysis of data from three national trucking companies during normal operations in 2004 shows the crash risk is statistically similar for the first six hours of driving and then increases in significant steps thereafter. The 11th hour has a crash risk more than three times the first hour."

Jovanis described the findings in a paper presented this week, during the 2005 International Truck & Bus Safety Security Symposium in Alexandria, Va.

Co-authors were Sang Woo Park, doctoral candidate in civil engineering; K-Yu Chen, a master's degree student in civil engineering; and Frank Gross, a doctoral candidate in civil engineering.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International


Explore further

Claims that fewer Aussies pay tax is not backed by data

Citation: Study: Truckers' risk higher in 11th hour (2005, November 15) retrieved 26 November 2021 from https://phys.org/news/2005-11-truckers-higher-11th-hour.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
0 shares

Feedback to editors