Study: Truckers' risk higher in 11th hour

November 15, 2005

Penn State scientists say crash risks for truck drivers during the last hour of a now legal 11-hour day are more than three times that of the first hour.

For 60 years, federal rules limited truckers to 10 consecutive hours of driving. However, in January 2004, that was raised to 11 hours.

But Penn State Professor Paul Jovanis, who led the study, said: "Our analysis of data from three national trucking companies during normal operations in 2004 shows the crash risk is statistically similar for the first six hours of driving and then increases in significant steps thereafter. The 11th hour has a crash risk more than three times the first hour."

Jovanis described the findings in a paper presented this week, during the 2005 International Truck & Bus Safety Security Symposium in Alexandria, Va.

Co-authors were Sang Woo Park, doctoral candidate in civil engineering; K-Yu Chen, a master's degree student in civil engineering; and Frank Gross, a doctoral candidate in civil engineering.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: We need to be cautious when assuming CCTV will prevent family violence

Related Stories

How HIV became a matter of international security

May 16, 2017

Richard Holbrooke sat in a blue striped chair in the meeting room of the United Nations Security Council. It was a rainy, unseasonably warm January day in New York City, just ten days into the new millennium. Many people ...

Recommended for you

Tiny magnetic tremors unlock exotic superconductivity

June 26, 2017

Deep within solids, individual electrons zip around on a nanoscale highway paved with atoms. For the most part, these electrons avoid one another, kept in separate lanes by their mutual repulsion. But vibrations in the atomic ...

More than meets the eye to ulcer-inducing bacterial protein

June 26, 2017

Scientists at The University of Western Australia and Perth-based biotech Ondek Pty Ltd have revealed new insights into the function of an important bacterial protein in Helicobacter pylori, the bacterium that causes stomach ...

Artificial brain helps Gaia catch speeding stars

June 26, 2017

With the help of software that mimics a human brain, ESA's Gaia satellite spotted six stars zipping at high speed from the centre of our galaxy to its outskirts. This could provide key information about some of the most obscure ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.