Mobile-phone viruses on the rise

November 11, 2005

There are now over 100 mobile-phone viruses in cyberspace, according to a Finnish computer group Friday.

F-Secure, which specializes in tackling computer viruses, said in a news release that since the first mobile virus was detected in June 2004, the number has now reached at least 102.

One of the most recent include Locknut.C, which is a "file Trojan that pretends to be patch for Symbian Series 600 mobile phones," F-Secure said. It added that the virus will crash critical components in the phone, which will make it effectively "locked" and unusable.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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