Bacteria build walls to withstand antibiotics

November 1, 2005

Antibiotic resistant bacteria, which are proliferating in hospitals and causing major headaches for physicians, cheat death by finding ways to fortify their cell walls against the deadly drugs. The question is: how?
New research from the laboratory of Alexander Tomasz shows that one gene, called mecA, enables some bacteria to withstand penicillin and other drugs in its class.

Part of a larger group called beta-lactam antibiotics, these drugs work by inhibiting proteins the bacteria need to construct their cell wall. If a Staphylococcus aureus bacterium has the mecA gene, however, it can still build a cell wall even in the presence of the antibiotics. But mecA is an acquired gene in S. aureus, and Tomasz and colleagues show that these bacteria probably picked mecA up from another bacteria called S. sciuri.

S. sciuri, which is only very remotely related to S. aureus, lives on the skin of domestic and wild animals, including mice, rats and squirrels. While all S. sciuri carry a gene closely related to mecA, they are virtually all fully sensitive to beta-lactam antibiotics. On rare occasions, a mutation occurs in mecA that renders them resistant. Tomasz’s group introduced this mutated gene into S. aureaus and showed that they then also became resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics.

“This suggests that the mecA gene originated in S. scuiri and then found its way into S. aureus,” says Tomasz, head of the Laboratory of Microbial Cell Biology and the Dr. Plutarch Papamarkou Professor. “Even though the two bacteria use different molecules to make their cell walls, we found that the mecA protein can use what is available to build the cell wall.

The findings on how antibiotic resistance is conferred may eventually help scientists and doctors prevent its spread.

Source: The Rockefeller University

Explore further: Novel antibiotic resistance gene in milk

Related Stories

Novel antibiotic resistance gene in milk

April 27, 2017

Researchers of the University of Bern have identified a new antibiotic resistance gene in bacteria from dairy cows. This gene confers resistance to all beta-lactam antibiotics including the last generation of cephalosporins ...

New strain of MRSA discovered

June 3, 2011

Scientists have identified a new strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) which occurs both in human and dairy cow populations.

MRSA emerged years before methicillin was even discovered

July 19, 2017

Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) emerged long before the introduction of the antibiotic methicillin into clinical practice, according to a study published in the open access journal Genome Biology. It was ...

Recommended for you

How to cut your lawn for grasshoppers

November 22, 2017

Picture a grasshopper landing randomly on a lawn of fixed area. If it then jumps a certain distance in a random direction, what shape should the lawn be to maximise the chance that the grasshopper stays on the lawn after ...

New discovery: Common jellyfish is actually two species

November 21, 2017

University of Delaware professor Patrick Gaffney and alumnus Keith Bayha, a research associate with the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, have determined that a common sea nettle jellyfish is actually two ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.