Green tea unlikely to reduce cancer risk

The evidence that green tea may reduce risk of some cancers is weak and its unlikely to cut cancer risk, U.S. Federal Drug Administration officials said.

"Two studies do not show that drinking green tea reduces the risk of breast cancer in women, but one weaker, more limited study suggests that drinking green tea may reduce this risk," the FDA said in a statement Friday. "Based on these studies, FDA concludes that it is highly unlikely that green tea reduces the risk of breast cancer."

In addition FDA said, "One weak and limited study does not show that drinking green tea reduces the risk of prostate cancer, but another weak and limited study suggests that drinking green tea may reduce this risk -- based on these studies, the FDA concludes that it is highly unlikely that green tea reduces the risk of prostate cancer."

The FDA will continue to evaluate new information on consumption of green tea to determine if changes in these claims, or in the decision, are necessary, the agency said.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International


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Citation: Green tea unlikely to reduce cancer risk (2005, July 1) retrieved 4 April 2020 from https://phys.org/news/2005-07-green-tea-cancer.html
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